Workshops by Day

Tuesday, Oct. 28 Wednesday, Oct. 29 Thursday, Oct. 30 All Days

Tuesday, October 28, 2014
8:00 AM - 9:30 AM
Session Description Track CEU
A01 Egress Requirements of the MA Building Code 8th ed., Chapter 10 Codes and Regulations LU HSW
Refresh your knowledge of the MA Building Code 8th ed. requirements for egress. Presentation will cover the requirements for exit access, exits including the provisions allowing open egress stairs and single exits, exit discharge, remoteness, accessible means of egress, calculating occupant load, required exit width, assembly aisle egress, special locking arrangements, horizontal exits, guards, handrails, and fire escapes. Major egress code differences between past editions of the code and 8th edition IBC-based code will be highlighted, as well as some of the variations in egress code requirements in the other New England states.
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A02 The Boston Convention and Exhibition Center (BCEC) Expansion as Catalyst for a New Urban District Urban Scale LU
Boston's industrial waterfront is rapidly shifting from low-density and maritime uses to a vibrant mixed-use urban district with the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center (BCEC) as an anchor. Learn about the new urban design framework developed for the Massachusetts Convention Center Authority to address the D Street corridor adjacent to the BCEC, where underutilized properties provide a "tabula rasa" urban design and development opportunity. The framework organizes five complementary master plan elements: the "big idea" for D Street public realm schematic design for the six-block corridor street activation plan for event programming, technology, lighting and public art retail tenanting strategy and district identity strategy. This will provide a methodology to proactively communicate the vision for the area enable evaluation of specific development proposals related to BCEC expansion and guide future development opportunities. A phasing plan guides the big moves necessary to prepare the land for development and expand the transportation network. The plan also provides opportunities for innovative concepts to be tested with temporary measures before being integrated into permanent features.
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A03 Concrete Specification & Environmental Considerations Building Performance LU HSW
Concrete is one of the most widely used construction materials in the world, valued for its strength, durability, aesthetic appeal, and multiplicity of uses. In an era where environmentalism has become a foremost consideration for those who design and construct buildings, there exists a paradox surrounding the "green" attributes of this material. On one hand are all the aforementioned desirable aspects of concrete, yet concrete has one of the highest embodied energies per unit of any building material on the market, contributing to CO2 emissions, water quality degradation, and tons of landfill waste. When designing sustainably, how should one make decisions, regarding this important material? This panel explores alternatives that should be considered, addressing their desirable aspects as well as possible drawbacks. Panelists represent industry leaders from various disciplines speaking on behalf of the "greening" potential for concrete solutions now and into the future.
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A04 Reimagining Boston's Historic Landscapes Landscape LU HSW
Focusing on metropolitan Boston historic landscapes and the designated landmark districts of Fort Point Channel and the South End, this workshop explores the design of new landscapes, including streetscapes, public parkland open space and historic townhouse gardens, and looks at ways of successfully achieving an appropriate balance between preservation of the historic, character-defining features and incorporation of changes necessary to reflect contemporary use. We will focus on preservation of historic features, materials, urban design patterns, and plant material. Recognition of significant 20th-century landscapes, currently landmarked or under threat will also be part of the discussion.
Speakers
  • David Berarducci, Principal, David Berarducci Landscape Architecture
  • Clarissa Rowe, Principal, Brown, Richardson & Rowe, Landscape Architects
  • Liz Vizza, Executive Director, The Friends of The Public Garden
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A05 What Goes Wrong with LED Lighting and Why Sound and Light LU HSW
Solid-state lighting technology offers architects new and exciting opportunities to provide lighting effects impossible with traditional sources. It also offers the potential for significant project failure. This presentation will examine where things go wrong when the characteristics of LED lighting are not fully considered. For example, legacy wiring and equipment can create unexpected performance problems with certain LED luminaires. Forgotten bits of old control software can also cause havoc. New features often provide unexpected consequences when creating some lighting effects. Numerous field examples will be discussed, showing what can go wrong and how to avoid many of the problems, most often in the case of retrofit projects. The rapid expansion of lighting controls in combination with LED technology will be covered. The instructor will also provide an update on how LED technology has changed over the past year. Concepts are explained in a simple and clear manner accessible to both technical and non-technical attendees.
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A06 Shared Programmatic Spaces for Education and Healthcare: Designs for Success Case Studies and Project Types LU HSW
The William J. Walczak Health and Education Center is a unique collaboration between two organizations, Codman Square Health Center and Codman Academy. The community-elevating objectives of these two entities resulted in this innovative partnership and facility. Central to its design and planning is the recognition that availability of great healthcare and superior education revitalizes and sustains communities. In addition to delivering the basics of health and education, the space was designed to orchestrate interactions between teachers, students and healthcare providers. The center has 17% shared space which allows for a highly interpersonal "bump rate " innovative and carefully thought-out design has enhanced students' exposure to the myriad opportunities in the healthcare sector, which accounts for 18% of all Boston-area jobs. The discussion will focus on how the planning, design, and construction of shared educational and healthcare spaces encourages frequent and meaningful interactions between students, faculty, and healthcare providers, and supports the highest level objectives for community wellness, education, and prosperity.
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A07 Bundle Up! Design Strategy Game Design Thinking and New Directions LU HSW
Architects, urban designers and planners know that the initial program directions which they set have the most far-reaching impacts on the ultimate outcome of any design. This is particularly true when developing strategies for highly-efficient energy design, where the characteristics of climate (sun, wind and light) can help or hinder. The purpose of the Bundle Up! Design Strategy Game is to make learning climatic design strategies and their complex interrelationships fun and easy. The session will offer participants a quick glimpse of the relationship of architecture to climate, to the natural and to the built environment, i.e. a refresher on the relationship of architecture to ecology. Participants will be instructed how to download the Bundle Up! material so that they can apply their ingenuity - either alone or with other professionals - as they set out to take maximum advantage of the energy savings offered by sun, wind and light in any given climactic region.
Speakers
  • Peter Papesch, Architect- Developer and Educator, Papesch Associates
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A08 Better Project Delivery Through Implementation of the National BIM Standard-US Business Management and Development LU
Much like the United States National CAD Standard (NCS), the National BIM Standard - United States (NBIMS-US)is an effort by members of the National Institute of Building Sciences (NIBS) to create consensus-based, open standards for the delivery of information important throughout the lifecycle of a building. The newest version, V3, released this Summer, provides design professionals, contractors, facility managers, and owners with technology, process, and best practice standards to facilitate data for the design, procurement, construction, and operation of a building. Presented by the Vice-Chair of the project committee responsible for its creation, this session gives an insider's look at all the parts of the standard, what they mean to the design professional, project partners, and clients, and how they can be successfully applied to the execution of a particular project, or the every day practices of a design firm.
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A09 Details for the Building Enclosure Building Enclosures LU HSW
In this workshop you'll learn how to stay out of trouble when detailing building enclosures. A brief review of building science - the management of heat, air and moisture - is combined with a review of contemporary details for commercial construction and how the principles of building science are applied to them. The principles of rainscreen cladding are integrated into the presentation. The presenter is nationally known for his expertise in the design of building enclosures.
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A10 Multifamily Housing and Accessibility: Untangling the Confusion Multifamily Housing LU HSW
Does this alphabet soup make sense to you: FHA, MAAB, ADA, UFAS, ABA, Section 504, IBC, Type A, Type B, Type C, Group 1, Group 2A, Group 2B. It's taken us a few years to figure out the accessibility requirements under the federal Fair Housing Act, the ADA, the Massachusetts AAB regulations, the International Building Code (adopted by RI, NH and CT) and, for federally funded projects, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. We'd like to share that knowledge with you. Some of our time will be spent figuring out which laws apply to various projects and how many units need to be accessible -- or somewhat accessible. We will also review design differences between the accessible and somewhat accessible units. At the end of the workshop you will leave with a chart that lays it all out.
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A11 Social Media: The Secret Sauce The Future of Practice LU
Design professionals love new visual media, want the best technological tools and are social creatures by nature. Why aren't we all over social media marketing? As social media has begun to penetrate the architecture and design community, individuals and firms face choices about how to engage with a variety of platforms. From determining content to tone of voice to frequency of posting to value, there are a lot of decisions to be made when it comes to embracing social media. In this interactive workshop, we emphasize staff education and on-boarding, building community, setting clear and achievable goals as well as content curation and platform selection. We'll use an individual practitioner's blog and social media presence alongside an example of firm-wide engagement to demonstrate the value of social media for raising a firm's profile and creating serendipitous connections.
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9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
Session Description Track CEU
TA2 What You Need to Know About Designing New Buildings in a Historic District Tours LU HSW
Designing new construction within a historic district doesn't have to be a minefield of process. Understanding the essence of a historic district and its historic commission's design standards and criteria can lead to a surprising variety of successful examples of new construction. Boston's historic South End, the country's largest Victorian Rowhouse District, was made a Landmark District in 1983, but contained scores of vacant lots and surface parking lots where contributing buildings were demolished by intent or neglect. The building booms of the last 15 years have filled in many of those vacant lots, providing many excellent examples of new projects, from multi-family housing, theaters, and church conversions on the grand avenues of Washington and Tremont Streets, to the intimate rowhouse infills of Shawmut Avenue and Lawrence Street. Two long-time Boston Landmark Commissioners and the South End Landmark District Commission staff preservationist will take you on a walking tour of the South End Landmark District, using it as a case study for new construction in a historic district, explaining what makes a building a "South End building" and demonstrating through many examples -- some more successful than others -- how new construction can best express itself as a "district" building.
Speakers
  • John Amodeo, Principal, CRJA-IBI Group
  • John Freeman, Principal, Platt Anderson Freeman Architects
  • Meghan Hanrahan, Preservation Planner, South End Landmark District Commission
  • Diane Parcon, Director of Capital Improvements & Facility Operations, Museum of African American History
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TA3 ***CANCELLED***Brigham Green: The Finished Project Tours LU HSW
Join us on this tour of the Thea and James M. Stoneman Centennial Park—also known as the reincarnated Brigham Green on Brigham and Women’s Longwood Campus. Brigham and Women’s restoration of the old Francis Street common near Huntington Avenue has added 400 underground patient parking spaces, and the park itself features a landscaped pedestrian gathering space and forecourt to the original hospital entrance. Centennial Park embodies the BRA’s directive to return a component of the Brigham campus landscape to that which existed a century ago. The tour will review lessons learned, and explain how these goals were achieved, all at a cost below the client’s original cost estimate.
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9:30 AM - 11:00 AM
Session Description Track CEU
TA1 ***CANCELLED***Tour of the Christina and John Markey Memorial Pedestrian Bridge Tours LU
An elegant and slender cable stayed pedestrian bridge was recently completed in the City of Revere, connecting the Blue Line Wonderland Station to historic Revere Beach. This tour will explain the background, design objectives, and structural/architectural detailing of this iconic new bridge which is intended to help revitalize the area and attract new transit-oriented development. The bridge was name in honor of the parents of Senator Ed Markey.
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10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
Session Description Track CEU
A21 Blueprint for Boston: A Design Identity for the Future ArchitectureBoston LU
The full span of Boston's design history, from its early settlement to the "New Boston" of the 1960s, can still be seen in the buildings and streets we know today. But how is Boston evolving in the 21st century at its frontiers of development and redevelopment? What are the hallmarks of Boston's design identity today? Join our panel of noted Boston architects for a thought-provoking dialogue on Boston's design future.
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A22 ADA Updates 2014 Codes and Regulations LU HSW
This year in addition to our annual update on proposed new design standards, we will use case studies to address some of the more commonly confusing aspects of the ADA Standards. This will be a hands-on workshop where participants will review plans and locate areas that are not in compliance - or note that the plan is fully compliant. Bring your pencil and your brain, because this year we will be asking the questions as well as answering your questions.
Speakers
  • Kathy Gips, Director of Training, New England ADA Center
  • Rex Pace, Accessibility Specialist, US Access Board
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A23 Connecting It All Together: The Casey Arborway Project Urban Scale LU
In the 1950s the car was king and Boston, like many cities, constructed elevated roadways to improve traffic flow. However, that legacy also created barriers between communities and, frequently, unattractive under-viaduct environments. Explore with us how the replacement of the Casey Overpass in Forest Hills with an at-grade parkway will reconnect a Boston neighborhood, provide stronger and more attractive pedestrian and bicycle facilities, and re-establish Boston's Emerald Necklace between the Arnold Arboretum and Franklin Park.
Speakers
  • George Batchelor, Supervisor of Landscape Design, Massachusetts Department of Transportation
  • Robbin Bergfors, Landscape Architect, Massachusetts Department of Transportation - Highway Division
  • Deneen Crosby, Principal, Crosby Schlessinger Smallridge
  • Louis Free, Assistant Vice President, Facilities Architecture, URS Corporation
  • Ruth Helfeld, Landscape Architecture Section Head, Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation
  • Kevin Horgan, Senior Landscape Architect, HNTB
  • Don Kindsvatter, Senior Urban Designer, Kleinfelder
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A24 The Passive House Standard in Large Commercial and Institutional Buildings: The Balance Between Super Insulation and Internal Gains Building Performance LU HSW
The benefits of a highly-insulated building shell in large commercial and institutional projects have been realized in Europe for many years, as architects and engineers have become familiar with the art of balancing building shell performance with appropriate passive and mechanical heating and cooling systems. While the Passive House Standard is becoming a more commonplace concept in residential practice in the U.S., it has not yet been tested on larger commercial and institutional building types. Such structures tend to have greater enclosed floor area per the building shell, with much higher occupant loads, ventilation rates and internal gains than residential structures. As a result, the design of the building form, shell and mechanical system concepts must respond accordingly. We will explore the theory behind implementing a highly-insulated building shell approach in new construction and renovations of large commercial and institutional projects, including the implications of solar gain, internal loads and ventilation rates as they determine the peak load design criteria of the mechanical systems. Several projects that are on the boards and under construction will be evaluated to understand the costs and benefits of this approach, exploring the beneficial trade-offs of an improved building shell vs. reduced, decentralized and simplified mechanical systems.
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A25 Employment Law for the Non-Lawyer Landscape LU
This workshop is designed for anyone who needs an understanding of employment law basics. The intended audience is professionals & business owners, who wants to be able to identify employment law issues before they become employment law problems. The workshop will provide an overview of relevant federal & state employment laws by highlighting the application of those laws for the participants through the life cycle of the employment relationship – from hiring, to managing the employment relationship, and finally to terminating the employment relationship, and post-employment considerations – so both employer & employee understand their rights and obligations in the employment relationship.
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A26 Massachusetts Port Authority: A Resilient Transportation Network Climate Resilience LU HSW
The Massachusetts Port Authority (Massport) connects New England to the world and promotes the regional economy through its operations. It owns and operates a world-class transportation network including three airports and significant maritime property in the port of Boston, and leases more than 500 acres in abutting neighborhoods. Over the past decade, Massport and its transportation partners have invested more than 4 billion to improve and modernize facilities and equip them with the latest time-saving and customer service amenities. Massport's forward-thinking leadership has also made resiliency planning a priority, ensuring that its investments in infrastructure and operations are better prepared for natural and man-made threats. Working with a variety of stakeholders, Massport's Resiliency Program has charted a 5-year strategic course focusing, initially, on an action-oriented study for Logan International Airport and Maritime Facilities. Our panel of experts will summarize their planning processes and findings, and engage the audience on such topics as: how to protect facilities against long-term sea-level rise, storm surges, intense storms other unplanned events how to maintain and restore operational capabilities during and after disruptive events and how to implement a balanced composite cost and risk plan. Both facility design and operational solutions will be explored.
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A27 Music Venues in Found Spaces: Acoustical Design for Adaptive Reuse Sound and Light LU HSW
In older cities like Boston, new performance venues are often retrofits of existing buildings. Such buildings' proportions and construction materials, standard for their own times and appropriate for their originally intended uses, may be both limitations and features of interest for contemporary performance facilities. This presentation will discuss the particular acoustical design challenges and considerations when adapting existing spaces for music performance or rehearsal.
Speakers
  • Matthew Azevedo, Consultant, Architectural Acoustics & Mechanical Systems, Acentech
  • Jonah Sacks, Senior Consultant and Group Director of Studio A, Acentech
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A28 Dematerializing Buildings: Building Better with Less Sustainable Energy Solutions (Sponsored by NESEA) LU HSW
The session will explore the cutting edge of material science for the built environment and the challenge of putting these advances into actual practice. The speakers will show a profusion of radical new innovations for dematerialization, drawing from fields such as nanotechnology and biomimicry. They will engage participants in identifying risks and dealing with challenges to using these lightweighting techniques and technologies to improve building performance, durability, and resilience.
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A29 CM at Risk for Public Work: Success Stories from Charter Schools Case Studies and Project Types LU
Hear from a charter school client, owner's project manager, architect, and construction manager about their experience using the Ch 149A CM-at-Risk delivery method on charter school projects. The project team will share best practices and lessons learned during the course of several projects. The presentation will review some of the innovative tools used by the team during the design & construction processes including: a full discipline design BIM, coordination modeling by subcontractors, and passive sustainable technologies. The particular benefits the CM-at-Risk delivery method can afford will also be discussed.
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A30 Cognitive Architecture: Evolution and Human Subconscious Responses To The Built Environment Design Thinking and New Directions LU
How should we think about something as complex as 'human nature' or establish guidelines for designing places for people we will never meet? How can we observe our own evolution at work right now as we scan the environment? This session, by the co-authors of a new book on this subject, looks at how evolution and recent findings in cognitive science provide a foundation for architecture and urban planning. It discusses two key subconscious tendencies recent research has revealed to be at work when we navigate the built environment. 1. Edges Matter: 'thigmotaxis', the wall-following trait common in mammals of prey, including humans, is at work when we effortlessly stroll down double-loaded corridors in a city, yet innately steer clear of the empty lots along the same path. 2. Patterns Matter: the human brain has a specific predisposition to prioritize vision over other senses and this has implications for building and design. Here we also address the fact our brain focuses on processing faces over other objects, and explore how facial patterns are found in craft as well as buildings, sometimes intentionally and sometimes quite inadvertently.
Speakers
  • Justin Hollander, Associate Professor, Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning, Tufts University
  • Ann Sussman, Author + Architect, Cognitive Architecture
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A31 Fiduciary Duty and Liability of Design Professionals Business Management and Development LU
The professional design community has been shaken by the multimillion dollar City of Victorville v. Carter Burgess lawsuit with fiduciary duty as a key issue in the this case. This presentation explores the difference between fiduciary duty and standard of care how to avoid, manage, and separate fiduciary duty and standard of care risks.
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A32 Transformation of Existing Buildings for a High Performance Future: Part 1 Existing and Historic Buildings LU HSW
All federal agencies are required to meet the requirements of EPACT and EISA, including the retrofit of existing building stock to meet energy performance levels required by law. Many other institutions also desire to upgrade existing building stock to high performance levels. Accomplishing this goal is an opportunity for the design community in giving a new lease on life for existing buildings and raising them to a high level of performance while protecting their historic fabric. Part 1 makes the case for transforming existing buildings to high performance, and covers roofing retrofit strategies for existing buildings.
Speakers
  • Wagdy Anis, Principal, Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc.
  • Richard Koziol, Principal, Wiss, Janney, Eltsner Associates, Inc.
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A33 High Performance Houses Don't Need to Look Ugly or Weird Residential Focus LU HSW
Building very energy-efficient and healthy homes is not a new concept, and such homes need not look unusual. This workshop will cover the anatomy and key factors for readily designing high-performance healthy homes which are attractive, extremely energy-efficient, and incorporate future-proof resilient design principles. Basic building science and cost-effective construction details regarding basements, walls, roofs, attics, HVAC systems, and indoor air quality will be presented, as well as performance results for new construction and renovated homes.
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11:30 AM - 11:00 PM
Session Description Track CEU
BSAC1 Engage: Community Outreach in the Time of Twitter
1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Session Description Track CEU
A41 Six Specs to Sunday For Emerging Professionals
What spec is right for your project? Sheetspecs - Preliminary Project Description - Outline Spec - Short-Form Spec - Full Project Manual Specs in BIM? In specifications, one size doesn't fit all! This session presents a concise summary of each of the predominant specification types so you can make effective choices for your firm. We look ahead to trends in specs, specifiers' property sets (SPie) and specs in BIM.
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A42 The ADA and the Regulations of the MA Architectural Access Board Codes and Regulations LU HSW
Confused about the differences between the ADA Standards and the regulations of the Massachusetts Architectural Access Board? You are not alone. One of these years the federal and state access requirements will harmonize, but until that happens we'll be offering this workshop. Critical issues include the required number of accessible entrances and accessible routes when vertical access is required in alterations when alterations catapult a project into full compliance with accessibility regulations and state and federal design differences for ramps, toilet rooms and hotel bathrooms. We will review access standards for recreation areas such as accessible routes to all ball fields and courts and accessible player seating. This session will provide an analysis of each of these areas, as well as major differences between the ADA Standards and Mass AAB regulations
Speakers
  • Kathy Gips, Director of Training, New England ADA Center
  • Rex Pace, Accessibility Specialist, US Access Board
  • Deborah Ryan, Owner, Deborah Ryan & Associates
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A43 The Changing Face of the Seaport Urban Scale LU
South Boston's Seaport District has experienced an incredible transformation over the past fifteen years. The construction of the Silver Line, the Federal Courthouse, and the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center helped to make the Seaport one of the hottest neighborhoods in the city. Meet four of the largest developers in the Seaport District and learn about their vision. What brought them to the Seaport? What were the challenges? What were the rewards? What is driving capital to the Seaport? The panel will discuss how they got here, what to expect over the next decade, and their vision for the Seaport once construction is complete.
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A44 ***CANCELLED*** Potential Value to Building Owners: Tracking Embedded Carbon Turnover and Sequestration in PVC Membranes Over Seven Years Building Performance LU HSW
Recent research suggests uncovered white roofs provide more payback for building owners than white roofs covered with soils or soils and plants. We intend to present data comparing exposed roofs (without soil or plants) and covered roofs (with soil and plants) to determine what environmental value these may have for a building owner from the point of view of carbon sequestration. Few if any studies in the U.S. have attempted to capture both kinds of data and then project benefits according to rooftop area, soil depth up to 30 cm and specie selection in terms of recalcitrant carbon and consideration of potential environmental impact.
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A45 Design for Disturbance: Anticipating the Post-construction Landscape in Site-Specific Design Landscape LU HSW
Designers often refer to their work as a "site-specific" response to the unique existing conditions of a preconstruction project landscape. But construction, whether of building or landscape - alters the dynamics of the site's ecology and in doing so, permanently alters the site. Current sustainable landscape design standards correctly call for limiting and mitigating the impacts of development-related disturbance, but proposals seeking to restore a landscape to its preconstruction conditions run the risk of recreating a visual aesthetic that is unsupported by altered site conditions. Ecological disturbance is part of the continuous cycle of change in every landscape and, in moderation, is an essential driver of a balanced ecosystem. In this workshop, the speaker will present case studies and discuss techniques for incorporating planned disturbance into the design process.
Speakers
  • Ann Kearsley, Landscape Architect/Principal, Ann Kearsley Design
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A46 Beyond Code - How Program Administrators Support Energy Savings for High Performance New Construction Codes and Regulations LU HSW
The Program Administrators (utilities) of Massachusetts provide technical support and financial incentives for high performance new construction projects. New construction solutions support design teams (architects/engineers), property owners and developers in their pursuit of energy savings and high performing buildings. Come learn in this session how financial incentives can lower the initial investment for higher-efficiency systems, and get an introduction to the resources and guidance designed to help lower building operating costs while ensuring occupant comfort. A new incentive structure for both the owner and the design teams will be discussed, along with the process to achieve these supports and a review of relevant case studies of recent high performing buildings.
Speakers
  • Tracey Beckstrom, Lead Commercial Sales Representative, National Grid
  • Roshan Bhakta, Program Manager - Energy Efficiency Services, NSTAR Electric & Gas Corporation
  • Kim Cullinane, Program Manager - Energy Efficiency Services, NSTAR Electric & Gas Corporation
  • Mark Stafford, Lead Account Executive Architect and Engineer Program, National Grid
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A47 Acoustics in Commercial Architecture: A Survey of Best Practices, Pitfalls, and Snake Oil Sound and Light LU HSW
Are you concerned that you may be under-designing or over-designing your project's acoustics? Do you wonder if certain "acoustical" products are a good value? Please join us for an accessible and candid discussion of fundamental acoustical design strategies for several of the most common building types. We will highlight architectural elements that warrant conservative acoustical design, and we will dispel some of the misunderstandings and marketing mystique that lead to overly expensive constructions.
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A48 Heat Pumps, Heat Pumps and More Heat Pumps Sustainable Energy Solutions (Sponsored by NESEA) LU HSW
In the interest of supporting zero net energy building efforts, this session will look at applications of air source heat pumps for space heating and cooling, domestic hot water, and pool heating. Real projects and data will be presented, along with lessons learned.
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A49 The Library of the Future Case Studies and Project Types LU
Libraries have never been more important or useful that they are today. In this era of ever-expanding information, libraries must place themselves at the forefront of this change and redefine the way people read, think, learn, and teach. In 2012, the Boston Public Library (BPL) created the Compass: Strategic Plan Principles as a vision for the library of the 21st century. The library of the future will be a user-centered institution and a center of knowledge, serving communities throughout the City. It will focus on access and innovation, special collections, children and teens, and sustainability. These principles are now being implemented into the BPL's new and existing building facilities. With the completion of the new East Boston Library and the studies for the renovation of the Central Library and the Roslindale and Dudley Branches, this vision is becoming a reality. Learn how the implementation of the Boston Public Library's Compass Principles are transforming and redefining the 21st century library.
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A50 The Business of Architecture: Emerging Models for Practice The Future of Practice LU
Technology, globalization and demographics are among the forces reshaping the building industry, along with every sector of the economy. Traditional models of architectural practice must be questioned as today's practitioners look to the future. What can we learn from other industries about business transformation and strategic reinvention? Our panelists will explore potential alternative futures for the business of architecture.
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A51 What Would You Say You Do Here? Business Management and Development LU
As firms rebound from the great recession, they do so leaner and with a different approach to work acquisition. Are business development professionals and a robust marketing staff necessary, or a necessary evil? Hear from veterans of marketing and business development alongside the technical principals they partner with. This interactive panel discussion will provide an in-depth look at the analytical tools and approaches that lead to winning work and what the future holds for these roles in professional services firms.
Speakers
  • Susan Gray, Director of Strategic Marketing, Shawmut Design and Construction
  • James Koloski, Director, Shawmut Design and Construction
  • Kathy McMahon, Vice President of Marketing and Communications, National Development
  • Ron Simoneau, Vice President, Shawmut Design and Construction
  • Ted Tye, Managing Partner, National Development
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A52 Learning from Our Legacy: Historical Federal Building Case Studies Existing and Historic Buildings LU HSW
As custodian for federally owned buildings, the General Services Administration is responsible for protecting and preserving some of the nation's most significant historic buildings. The New England Region is particularly rich in history. GSA New England (Region 1) serves as steward for a number of treasured structures, among them the National Historic Landmark Greek Revival-style New Bedford Custom House (the nation's oldest continuously operating custom house), the Renaissance Revival-Second Empire-style Portland Custom House, and the Italian Renaissance Revival-style Gignoux Courthouse in Portland, ME, all of which have undergone major restorations in the past two years. Hear about these recent projects, including technical problems, analysis and solutions for water infiltration, window replacement, energy efficiency, and damaged plaster and other historic materials. The panel will discuss financial and design challenges of the continuing use of historic structures, including appropriate restoration of historic fabric, identification of appropriate uses, accessibility and community engagement, and the challenges of working in occupied buildings. While each of these buildings posed unique challenges, the combined presentation will cover a broad range of issues that should be addressed in the restoration of historic structures
Speakers
  • Judith Bowen, Architect, General Services Administration
  • Gianne Conard, Regional Chief Architect, General Services Administration
  • Elizabeth Mees, Architect, General Services Administration
  • Sean Orgel, Architect, General Services Administration
  • Paul Rojko, Branch Chief, Technical Services Branch, General Services Administration
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A53 Applying Passive House Principles to 160 Units of Affordable Housing: Lessons Learned Multifamily Housing LU HSW
Fairfax Gardens was a 150-unit dilapidated public housing development in Taunton, MA. The THA selected Trinity Financial to be the developer, owner and operator of a 160-unit replacement program on two sites. The Hope VI Program requires a very competitive funding application that includes strong sustainability incentives measured using LEED and/or Enterprise Green community checklist criteria. The Fairfax Gardens funding application was successful in part because it committed to very aggressive energy conservation measures. To meet these commitments, the development team, including the THA, EJP Associates, Trinity Financial, New Ecology, the Architectural Team, Petersen Engineering and CWC Builders, had to work collaboratively through the design process from the ""green charrette"" on, to develop systems and details that would produce one of the most energy efficient affordable housing developments in the country. Emphasis was put on simplicity for operation and maintenance, affordability, constructability at scale, dependability, and very low energy bills for residents. In addition, the project had to negotiate the myriad regulations governing allowable rents and utility charges promulgated by HUD, DHCD, the LIHTC Program and the Taunton Municipal Light & Power Utility Company. The resulting design decisions were often unexpected.
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A54 Transformation of Existing Buildings for a High Performance Future: Part 2 Existing and Historic Buildings LU HSW
Part 2 of this workshop covers retrofit of masonry and other opaque walls. Masonry walls can be sensitive to proper assessment and testing of condition prior to developing an insulation strategy. Masonry can be retrofit from inside or outside. Thermal bridges and deterioration of embedded components will be discussed. Retrofit of fenestration or other cladding strategies for high performance are reviewed. Code requirements and beyond code requirements are discussed. Case studies of projects will be presented with examples of high performance fenestration.
Speakers
  • Anthony Cinnamon, Associate Principal, Wiss, Janney, Eltsner Associates, Inc.
  • Wei Lam, Associate Principal, Wiss, Janney, Eltsner Associates, Inc.
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2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Session Description Track CEU
AfHB1 Design Like You Give a Damn! An introduction to Architecture for Humanity Featuring Local Projects and Projects in the Developing World Designed by the Boston Chapter LU
In this one-hour workshop members of the Boston Chapter of Architecture for Humanity (AfHB) will describe the worldwide organization and the local chapter and describe several AfHB projects both in the Boston area and in the developing world. A focus will be put on four projects: an orphanage in Nepal, a trade school in Haiti, a sustainable agriculture training center in Madagascar and work with the Fund for Boston to adapt homes for victims of the Boston bombing. Time will be allotted for questions and discussion. There will also be a discussion of the challenges of preparing designs in Boston, far away from the site and the community for which the project is to be built and the communication challenges of working in the developing world. Time will be allotted for questions and discussion.
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3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Session Description Track CEU
BSAC2 The Architect Never Gets the Girl (or Boy!)
Either an anti-hero or larger-than-life, architects have been inaccurately portrayed in literature. Join a lively discussion as we determine if words can ever really describe what architects do. With Moderator: Jay Wickersham FAIA Panelists: Diane Georgopulos FAIA, Architect for MassHousing Alex Beam, Columnist Boston Globe
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3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Session Description Track CEU
A61 Photography From All Angles For Emerging Professionals
A picture is worth a thousand words -- and might cost you thousands of dollars! But not all pictures tell the story in the same way. A photo for your portfolio might not work for an ad campaign or get you into an editorial publication or win a competition. We look at photography from all angles and help you get the most for your money.
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A62 Common Errors in Transient Lodging: Hotels, Motels, Extended Stay and Dorms Codes and Regulations LU HSW
Accessibility for transient lodging recognizes that customers with varying needs must be successfully accommodated in their facility, with little or no need for modification. People who benefit from the architectural features of accessibility may have different strengths and weaknesses and possibly overlapping needs. This session will discuss the most common accessibility errors in transient lodging, from a user perspective and from a compliance perspective. Hear from two accessibility consultants who are out in the field, observing the variety of conditions faced by the hospitality and housing market. They will use photographs to illustrate the myriad conditions they've seen. They will review the requirements for sleeping rooms/toilet rooms, public areas, recreation and dining areas and other spaces open to the public.
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A64 Raising the BAR: Building Asset Ratings to Enhance Energy Assessments and Increase Efficiency Investment Building Performance LU HSW
The Massachusetts Building Asset Rating (BAR) pilot is the culmination of five years of research seeking to provide investment-grade information about energy efficiency opportunities in commercial buildings in less time and with less cost than conventional methods. It has recently produced an assessment methodology for office buildings that leverages utility consumption data and real estate asset information to provide calibrated but durable energy usage metrics. Combining the BAR method with streamlined energy modeling tools produces detailed and robust building energy assessments with energy improvement recommendations for significantly less time and cost than a traditional ASHRAE Level II audit. Furthermore, by controlling for operational differences in the buildings, the BAR scores enable meaningful comparisons of performance and investment opportunities between buildings. This presentation will introduce and explain the BAR analysis method, share summary results of 35 buildings in phase 2 of the pilot, and discuss potential policy and market applications. Furthermore, the speakers will address the advantages and challenges associated with "operational" and "asset" ratings, and contextualize the BAR pilot with respect to a federal asset rating pilot and local energy disclosure ordinances, such as Boston's BERDO initiative.
Speakers
  • Martine Dion, Principal & Director of Sustainable Design, SMMA
  • Ian Finlayson, Deputy Director, Energy Efficiency Division, Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources
  • Kevin Rose, Building Energy Technical Associate, NEEP
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A65 Green Infrastructure: Landscape Performance Research & Implementation Case Study Landscape LU HSW
This workshop will present studies of the benefits of bioretention and constructed wetlands. Many green infrastructure strategies rely on the natural capacities of soil to absorb and cleanse stormwater. Despite soils' critical role in managing water quality, many design questions persist regarding appropriate soil composition, depths and configuration. The bioretention segment presents the results of a laboratory study (Stantec/University of New Hampshire Stormwater Center collaboration) and field study (Stantec/Boston Parks and Recreation Department) examining the ability of a variety of soil mixes to remove nitrogen and phosphorus from stormwater. The emphasis of these studies is on practical applications that can be applied on a wide variety of real-world projects. Similar to bioretention systems, constructed wetlands utilize plants and manufactured soils to treat urban runoff. We will examine a highly functional stormwater wetland in Cambridge MA to identify how "green infrastructure" principles were used to attenuate flows and improve water quality while replacing conventional "grey" infrastructure. Completed in 2013, the wetland and forebay system provide treatment of "first flush" via sediment removal, biological filtration, and thermal regulation. Over 120,000 native plants in five unique hydrological zones were used in the wetland to slow down and absorb contaminants prior to being discharged downstream.
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A66 Inside Baseball: A Review of the Waterproofing Project at Boston's Fenway Park Case Studies and Project Types LU HSW
Faced with extensive deterioration the concrete bowl of Fenway Park was in danger of needing to be replaced. Talks included the demolition and replacement of this Shrine to America's Past Time. Thankfully a project was funded to repair and waterproof the stadium which culminated in the Red Sox first homefield World Series Victory in almost a century. This presentation is designed to review the project including first hand accounts solving the problems associated with a winter waterproofing application.
Speakers
  • Brian Kelly, National Project Design & Specification Manager, Kemper System America, Inc.
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A67 Color's Solar Power Sound and Light LU
Those serious about green design know that small gains in energy reduction really add up. Color selections in material use may seem like the icing on the cake, but strategic planning from the start of a design enhances natural light, perceptions of space and perceived temperature. No longer simply a tool for style and decor, color has shown itself to be a force for sustainable architectural solutions. This workshop begins where Josef Albers left off in "Interaction of Color", the ground breaking 20th-century color theory text. If you've found yourself wondering how you can make use of the illusions that you learned in design school, be prepare to be amazed by what can be done with color in 3D. Taking our cues from the human response to sunlight, we will examine the principles of color perspective in current architectural designs. Supported by recent neuroscience, long-held practices of 19th- and 20th-century landscapes painters will be explored for their value to making the built environment more to our liking. When seen from the point of controlling human perceptions with the power of the sun, you will never again overlook the impact of a color choice.
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A68 Learning from Innovative, Responsive, and Large Scale Energy Efficient Housing in Europe Sustainable Energy Solutions (Sponsored by NESEA) LU HSW
Sweden's housing market is dominated by industrial production of energy efficient houses. In this mature market, fabrication techniques, products, and components have all been optimized for efficient factory building, and the off-site process has been leveraged to make energy efficient construction affordable and universal. In Germany, design, innovation and low carbon construction are changing the future of sustainable urban living. The Soft House, a set row houses built for the International Building Exhibition (IBA) in Hamburg, demonstrates an 'active' architecture that responds to environmental conditions and homeowners' changing needs over time while also exceeding passive-house energy requirements. This presentation will discuss how these design and production concepts can be easily adopted here in the United States, and transform the North American Housing Industry.
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A69 A Lean Case Study: The Opening of a New Terminal for Operations Case Studies and Project Types LU
Application of Lean Construction for all phases of project delivery is increasing as owners, designers, construction managers, and trade contractors embrace these new practices. Although Lean has taken hold in some areas of the private sector, it has been more challenging to implement in the public sector, with its myriad statutory and regulatory constraints. Massport has made a programmatic commitment to the use of Lean principles and tools in the delivery of its projects. Recently Massport implemented Lean pull planning on the operational opening of the renovated Terminal B at Logan Airport, which included the consolidation of United Airlines operations into one terminal. We will present a case study of how Lean pull planning was used to foster collaboration among diverse stakeholders increase communication and coordination among stakeholders and improve the planning and efficiency in completion of the many elements of work that were required to "go operational." The presenters will describe the benefits and challenges of coordinating a diverse group of stakeholders in large and diverse organization subject to public sector project delivery constraints. They will also address lessons learned that will be applied to future Massport projects.
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A70 Moving Beyond A/E to an Integrated Practice The Future of Practice LU
A truly integrated practice is interdisciplinary vs. multidisciplinary -- anyone at the table can emerge as a leader vs. each discipline owning a distinct scope of work without intentional collaboration. This approach has both benefits and challenges most importantly, how can our clients benefit? We will discuss how different marketplace perceptions inform project delivery, and examine differing regional office experiences within a company. We'll explore the shifting role of "prime" within an integrated company, as well as branding of a design practice within the larger company. We'll consider the designation of P&L centers throughout the company: sector based vs. practice based vs. location based, etc. What will foster the most successful culture? We'll also discuss the view from the corner office: what do owners perceive as the most successful model?
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A71 Lean Architecture: Rethinking your Firm Business Management and Development LU
Today's architectural practice demands innovative methods for project delivery. Many firms increasingly share work across the country and globe, and technologies such as BIM are changing the fundamental workings of the profession. The adoption of "Lean" principles as a basis for increasing firm-wide delivery efficiencies can help in meeting today's challenges. Significant attention has been paid to how architects, contractors, and clients can better work together yet, less attention has been given to how firms work internally and the significant gains that can be achieved if we step back and rethink our processes. Explore the difficulties hear about the successes and failures and learn proven strategies from two specialists representing different firms who are approaching these issues in a similar manner.
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A73 Transformation of Existing Buildings for a High Performance Future:Part 3 Existing and Historic Buildings LU HSW
Part 3 of this workshop continues with double facades as a retrofit strategy and will review the pros and cons of this approach to retrofitting existing buildings with new facades, including blast resistance hardening of the structure. The second apart of this presentation will review approaches for achieving air-tightness both in exterior cladding, gut and partial renovations.
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  • Wagdy Anis, Principal, Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc.
  • Anthony Cinnamon, Associate Principal, Wiss, Janney, Eltsner Associates, Inc.
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4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Session Description Track CEU
AfHB2 Appropriate Construction Technology: Low Cost, Low Impact Construction Techniques for Developing World Situations LU HSW
Much construction throughout the developing world is completed without the industrial processes common in the developed world. Low cost, low impact technologies using locally-available materials can provide local employment, engage the local community and avoid negative environmental damage. In this one-hour session, members of Architecture for Humanity, Boston (AfHB) will discuss the philosophy behind the use of such materials and techniques, discuss the experience of the chapter in designing buildings in the developing world to be built with economical locally available materials and the challenges that they can pose. Both AfHB projects and non-AfHB projects will be used as examples. Among the techniques and materials discussed will be Earth Block Construction; Bamboo Construction and the use of waste materials such as tires, glass and plastic bottles as construction materials. Time will be allotted for questions and discussion.
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SA3 Design Awards Reception
The design awards reception celebrates those projects recognized by the BSA’s 2014 Design Awards program. Join recognized firms and jurors in the ABX Design Gallery for a sneak peak of all recognized projects prior to the Annual Awards gala on January 29, 2015, when the levels of the awards will be revealed.
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SA4 Tweet Up
6:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Session Description Track CEU
A81 Design and Construct Your Perfect Design and Construction Career: Fantasies, Nightmares, Stories -- and Maybe, Lessons Learned For Emerging Professionals
Design and construction careers have strong potential to do much more than provide income. At their best, they can also simulate your intellect, provide opportunities for creative expression, offer channels for engagement with interesting peers and open doors to improve humankind. It's also possible you may encounter some problems. The same abilities that help you land a job can also restrict career development, pigeonholing you into a limited range of project opportunities. The time that it takes to meet everyday work requirements can make it difficult to explore alternative career paths. The need to earn an income can make it necessary to take on dead-end tasks. The limited mentoring skills and interests of senior leaders can make it difficult to find useful guidance. Drawing on panelists' extensive experience, this workshop enables participants to identify and avoid predictable problems, understand and use career design tools, and plan their own career more effectively. Participants leave the workshop with an overall understanding of what's possible in architectural careers and specific tools to help achieve it.
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A82 MEP/FP - Understanding the Systems Basics and Designing for Success Building Performance LU HSW
This workshop contains everything non-engineers - such as architects - need to know about the basic function and operation of HVAC, electrical, plumbing and fire protection (MEP/FP) building systems in an easy-to-understand way. Included in the subject matter is the difference between certain systems, what they are, how they operate, and samples of what buildings they are in. We will also explain how to incorporate the systems into the design of a building based on function, performance and clearances, and why certain systems are used within different buildings. We will share examples of building systems in actual buildings in Boston. For each MEP/FP building system covered, the instructors will include a list of local buildings that currently have the system in place.
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A83 Lighting Control Systems: What Architects and Interior Designers Need to Know Sound and Light LU HSW
Architectural lighting and the control of architectural lighting are progressing at a dizzying pace and have never been more important. Some drivers of this trend are: -The rapid ascent of LEDs for architectural lighting. -More stringent energy requirements for lighting. -Increasing code requirements for lighting controls, including occupancy and daylight sensing. -Developments in digital addressing. -Progress in wireless networking for lighting control. -The often rapid payback for investments made in lighting controls. Research shows lighting directly affects worker productivity and user satisfaction. This session, presented by a father-son team, will give architects and interior designers foundation knowledge of current lighting control systems, both wired and wireless, enabling them to provide preliminary design direction and specifications and intelligently and creatively collaborate with lighting designers, electrical engineers, lighting control and fixture representatives, and lighting integrators.
Speakers
  • Ray Urban, project manager, Goody Clancy
  • Adam Urban, Applications Engineering Manager for Design and Development, Philips Color Kinetics
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A84 Game On - New and Green versus Old and Stodgy Sustainable Energy Solutions (Sponsored by NESEA) LU HSW
Recently, the NYT reported that new, highly regarded sustainable apartment buildings are being graded very poorly in the NYC's benchmarking grading system (recently adopted by Boston) some are even doing poorly in comparison to pre-war walkup buildings elsewhere in the NYC. The article pondered, The reasons are not entirely clear, the report said, but some building efficiency experts said older buildings were more likely to have thicker walls and fewer windows and glass. As we all know, the reasons are significantly more substantial than this. This session will document apartment building energy and water usage, and we will see the critical errors that are present that cause catastrophic usage.
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A85 Step Outside the Box: Reimagining Corporate Communications Business Management and Development LU
You're an AEC firm looking to take charge of your communications. In an increasingly "noisy" world, how can you stand out? For this session, we've gone directly to the source to find unique approaches for engaging the media and bloggers creating compelling content – written, graphical and video – aimed at both internal and external audiences and driving adoption of social media among staff. Through detailed real-world examples, we'll walk you step-by-step through the process these firms engaged to leverage existing in-house staff, both marketing and technical, to step outside the box and differentiate themselves from their competition. Each panelist will offer lessons learned as well as advice on incorporating these types of marketing activities at firms of all sizes.
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A86 New Window, Old Masonry: Contemporary Window Performance in a Traditional Masonry Wall Opening Existing and Historic Buildings LU HSW
New England's extensive stock of existing masonry buildings are prime candidates for re-use or rehabilitation in today's green-minded society. While the masonry material and configuration of these buildings often varies, their fenestration regularly consisted of punched openings with wood windows. These windows were often poorly maintained, have been all or partially replaced with now-outdated infill windows, or do not meet contemporary energy standards or air/water infiltration expectations. Replacing these windows with new higher-performance contemporary windows can provide significant improvements to overall energy performance and occupant comfort however, improperly integrating these new windows with the adjacent wall systems can limit these benefits and expose the masonry wall system to new potential problems. Through examples and analysis, this presentation will focus on: the importance of integrating wall thermal, air, and vapor barriers with the window opening, and the potential energy, performance, and durability drawbacks if these systems are not properly integrated; when and where to provide flashing in window openings, and potential risks of water infiltrating into the masonry at improperly flashed openings; factors in window and glazing selection, including design considerations for retrofitting existing windows; and the role thermal modeling and air and water infiltration testing play in properly integrating a new window system into an existing masonry opening.
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  • Jason Der Ananian, Senior Staff Engineer-Building Technology, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc
  • Nick Floyd, Senior Project Manager, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc.
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A87 30 Years of Warranty Visits: What We've Learned Residential Focus LU HSW
Byggmeister has been remodeling homes in the Boston area for over 30 years. For most of that time we've had a policy of periodically returning to past projects to see how they've held up. In this workshop we'll freely share what we've learned about what sorts of products, construction techniques, and designs wear well with time and -- more importantly -- which ones don't. If you're at all concerned with the durability and longevity of your work, this will be an extremely informative session.
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SA1 ABX Social - An Opening Night Celebration
Come to eat, rub elbows, and clink glasses with your building industry colleagues. One of the greatest networking opportunities of the year, this is your chance to connect with ABX exhibitors and attendees as well as BSA members.
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Wednesday, October 29, 2014
8:00 AM - 9:30 AM
Session Description Track CEU
B02 Commercial Fenestration Energy Ratings and Energy Codes Codes and Regulations LU HSW
This course covers the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and ASHRAE 90.1-2007 door, window and skylight requirements, and the basics of how code-compliant fenestration is used in the energy envelope and how the manufacturer shows compliance via NFRC 100, 200 and the NFRC certification program. We discuss the methods for meeting certification and labeling requirements for site-built and factory-supplied fenestration, and provide an overview of third-party performance-simulation information, plans submittal process, and Label Certificate validation by an NFRC accredited inspection and certification agency. We demonstrate NFRC's newly-developed CMAST (component modeling approach software tool) as both a design tool for developing specifications for high-performance fenestration systems and an integral part of the commercial certification program. The course content is relevant to architects, glazing subcontractors, design professionals, jurisdictional building plans examiners and field inspectors.
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  • Ray McGowan, Senior Program Manager, National Fenestration Rating Council
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B03 The Power of Construction Cost Analysis with HERS Rating Construction LU HSW
HERS Rating is now used more and more for residential energy code compliance, rebates and marketing, but standard HERS Rating is just a projection of energy performance that doesn't include construction costs. Without accurate modeling of construction costs vs. performance, any investment in the multitude of energy-related features of a home will rarely be optimal. Learn about our experience as HERS raters, optimizing energy performance vs construction costs. We use a new HERS Rating software that includes construction costs and is able to quickly run thousands of energy modeling scenarios in order to arrive at the most cost-effective packages of residential energy features. With this type of cost-optimization, some projects will discover massive construction costs savings as their investment in energy features is wisely balanced among all of the energy-related features of a home while still reaching a particular energy performance requirement. Other projects will discover the most cost-effective strategy to get to net-zero homes and beyond (to energy positive!) Find out how optimization of performance vs. cost can work for your projects!
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B04 High Performance Schools: Seizing the Built Community's Teachable Moment Building Performance LU HSW
The building community is in the midst of a unique opportunity. School districts across the country are confronted by aging facilities in dire need of renovation or new construction. Inside these schools, many of our children spend their days in dimly lit and noisy rooms, surrounded by environmental contaminants and antiquated HVAC systems. Investments in forward-thinking school building design, construction, and operation can demonstrate to students, staff, families, and communities the benefits of building performance. This presentation will explore the benefits of high performance schools from the perspective of a nonprofit advocate, architect and commissioning agent. Using two Rhode Island case studies, presenters will demonstrate specific design and commissioning principles associated with healthier, more efficient, and higher-performing schools. Hear from Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships (NEEP) about tools, such as the pioneering Collaborative for High Performance Schools (CHPS) protocol in use across the Northeast. Examining his work at Claiborne Pell Elementary School, Matt LaRue of HMFH Architects will detail how proper design can offer an enhanced learning environment. Focusing on his work at the Paul W. Crowley Metropolitan Career and Technical Academy, Chris Armstrong of Steven Turner Inc. will detail how proper commissioning can enhance school performance.
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B05 Park and Parcel: Boston's First Universally Inclusive Public Open Space Landscape LU HSW
The challenge: create an inclusive, compelling public open space for all in a complex public/private framework . The designers of the new Thomas M. Menino Playground share stories of 1. The site (former Dry Dock #5 used in World War II for ship repair), the neighborhood (historic Charlestown Navy Yard), the contaminants (lead and arsenic), the neighbor (newly opened Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital), the politics (outgoing Mayor Thomas M. Menino requires park to be designed and built in 7 months!). 2. Design strategies and public engagement techniques that led to a strong design concept that will resonate with visitors for decades to come. 3. Spaulding Rehab facilitating the collaboration of landscape architects and occupational therapists to develop a multi-generational open space that will serve every single visitor. The example of this project calls us to increase our rigor in making public spaces truly inclusive so that able-bodied brothers and mobility-assisted sisters can swing and play side by side so that dads in wheelchairs can take their kids to a park that is challenging and fun yet integrated for full access.
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  • Gene Bolinger, Vice President, Weston & Sampson
  • Lauren Bryant, Project Manager, Parks and Recreation, City of Boston
  • Chris Cook, Commissioner, Boston Parks and Recreation, City of Boston
  • Rebecca Kaiser, Chief of Staff, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital
  • Cheri Ruane, Practice Leader, Spurr / Weston & Sampson
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B06 Sea Change: Long-Term Resiliency for Greater Boston and Beyond Climate Resilience LU HSW
It is projected that sea levels will rise two feet by mid-century and six feet by 2100. The new tide line will transform the coastal landscape of Greater Boston, and increase the probability of a major storm devastating the metropolitan region. With the goal of advocating for a long-term resiliency strategy for the Greater Boston area, Sasaki launched a research initiative on sea level rise called Sea Change. The research culminated in an exhibition of the same name at BostonÕs District Hall in the spring of 2014. The key findings and recommendations of this 18-month initiative will be presented as an introduction and a catalyst for a broader discussion of the role design can play in BostonÕs dynamic future. Brief case studies will follow, focusing on various scales of response. This will include faculty from MIT on a resilient urban design framework for the New Jersey Meadowlands, SasakiÕs Gina Ford on ecological landscape responses deployed across the US, and Unabridged ArchitectureÕs Allison Anderson on resilient buildings from their work on the Gulf Coast and in Bridgeport, Connecticut.
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B08 The Value In Building Enclosure Inspections Building Enclosures LU HSW
Following several high-profile facade component failures, many large cities have enacted facade inspection ordinances requiring regular inspections of taller buildings. However, a regular building enclosure inspection program can be more than just a regulation-mandated check-box activity. Routine building enclosure inspections of a variety of building types are a useful tool for building owners and managers. Comprehensive inspections can help to maintain the enclosure performance, prevent costly major capital rehabilitation projects, and mitigate potential hazards. Owner-initiated inspection plans are an important step to keep enclosures safe, code-compliant, and improve long-term durability and performance. This presentation will review the steps to implementing a successful building enclosure inspection program the appropriate role for both the building owners' and managers' staff, and for outside consultants and techniques and technologies for implementing an inspection program. Through case studies we will explore what signs to look for when completing an inspection; when it is appropriate to complete a survey from grade versus a hands-on survey; good record keeping techniques and planning and budgeting considerations for enclosure maintenance.
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B09 Studio-Based Learning Center at the University of Connecticut Health Care Center Case Studies and Project Types LU
The panel will present the 252-seat studio-based learning (SBL) space at the University of Connecticut Health Care Center from their unique perspectives as owner, architect, and technology designer. The new facility will be used to support the degree programs in medicine, dentistry and biomedical science. The 70' diameter circular SBL space with a 20' high finished ceiling will be the focus of the panel discussion. The highly flexible space can be easily configured to support student collaboration, lectures, multiple meetings, and secure testing. The technology systems that include wireless access points, wired connections, three concave 12'x20' projection screens located on the perimeter walls, digital steerable arrays (loudspeakers), and cameras used for lecture capture and streaming blend into the architecture of the space. The panelists will discuss the design process of the SBL space from concept to completion of the contract document.
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B10 So You Want to Change the World? The Future of Practice LU
Many of us enter the architecture profession believing that good design can shape a better world, only to crash into the harsh and often all-too-elite reality of traditional fee-for-service. Yet in our post-9/11, post-Katrina, post-Occupy world, interest in public interest design continues to rise. How to take on public interest or community based projects AND make a living as an architect? How can this improve -- or impair -- your bottom line? What new practice models and projects are emerging? How to channel all this good will into effectiveness? What creates "success" in public interest projects? What makes these projects actually make a long term difference? How could architects be more effective? Firm principals who have embraced public interest design for decades will explore these questions, joined by leaders from small and large firms that have more recently taken them on. We will also hear from Anne Marie Lubeneau, director of the Rudy Bruner Award, which, for the past 25 years, has been comprehensively studying and recognizing innovative projects that create urban excellence.
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B11 Improving Leadership In Design and Construction Organizations Business Management and Development LU
What do the most effective leaders in design firms and construction companies do? How has the nature of effective leadership changed? Is it possible to learn leadership? We often hear about a leadership gap in our industry. We know our organizations lag far behind other industries in improving productivity and performance and implementing needed innovation. We know we waste precious time and resources in logjams between architects and contractors and, worse, within our own organizations. We know it's up to our leaders to take the initiative to move us forward. This workshop enables participants to better understand what effective leadership is now, chart their organization's needs and improve the leadership they themselves provide. Drawing on panelists' extensive real-world experience with leadership performance and development, participants learn to identify key competencies to develop, pitfalls to avoid, and best practices to apply. Participants leave the workshop with specific concepts and foundations to improve leadership performance.
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B12 Improving Energy Performance in Existing Buildings Existing and Historic Buildings LU HSW
While much focus has been placed on building codes for new construction projects, the majority of building projects focus on the renovation and repair of existing buildings and structures. These projects represent significant potential for energy savings, even more so than new construction projects. However, maximizing energy savings in existing buildings is often a difficult exercise given the constraints of existing construction, and in some cases energy code-mandated upgrades are either impractical or of little real benefit to projects. This presentation reviews the basics of energy efficiency in both new and existing buildings and discusses the relative magnitude of changes such as enclosure, lighting, and mechanical system upgrades. Energy code requirements for existing buildings will be reviewed, including compliance paths and alternate ways to meet these requirements. Lastly, procedures and for evaluating the energy performance of existing buildings will be discussed, as well as programs for financing and implementing repairs to improve efficiency and reduce energy costs.
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B13 Pushing Wood Framing to Higher Heights Multifamily Housing LU HSW
Changes in the International Building Code (IBC) have significantly altered the ability to build taller housing structures in wood framing. The changes are allowing height, area and construction type options for mixed-use structures previously not possible. The lower construction cost of these tall wood framed structures makes them an attractive option in the urban core. In this session, we will explore the design and technical challenges of building to 70 feet and higher with wood framing.
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SB12 WID Keynote Breakfast - Creative Entrepreneurship: Breaking from Convention Women in Design Symposium
Entrepreneurship is an oft-heard buzzword across business sectors. What does it mean for creatives in today's economic landscape? This year, Women in Design have invited five practitioners from various business and design backgrounds to hold a spirited discussion about the impact of entrepreneurial thinking. From innovative practice models to protecting creative property and stimulating economic growth, the panel will provide a range of insights into the many opportunities for the creative professional. Enjoy breakfast with colleagues and hear the panel tackle this timely topic.
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9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
Session Description Track CEU
TB1 ***SOLD OUT*** Restoring MIT's Historic Main Group: Building 2 Tours LU HSW
This hard-hat tour will allow attendees to experience the construction of the first major renewal and expansion of MIT's historic Main Group. The renovation and expansion of Building 2 is the first project in a 1.1M gsf renewal campaign of MIT's 100-year-old historic core, the result of a 10-year planning process. The 90,000 sf project will accommodate MIT's largest Department, Mathematics, and includes restoration of the historic fa¨cade, window replication and replacement, accessibility and code upgrades, and for the first time, a rooftop addition to the original Bosworth building. The interior includes classrooms, multi-function common spaces, and a tiered lecture hall. The addition will add a full floor of faculty offices, gathering spaces, and graduate resources. State-of-the-art systems integration into the 1916 landmark will include active and passive chilled beams and daylight-responsive LED lighting. The tour will be led by the architect, construction manager, mechanical engineer and Gary Tondorf Dick, MIT's Program Manager for Capital Projects, and will include discussions on: landscape and infrastructure upgrades interior renovation and the new rooftop addition systems and finish integration, including lecture hall, classrooms, departmental common spaces, faculty offices, and student workspaces and historic fac¨ade masonry restoration and window replacement.
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TB2 Lost Half Mile, Found! Reclaiming a Postindustrial Waterfront Tours LU
The Charles River's "Lost Half Mile" was inaccessible for over a century until mitigation for the Central Artery/Tunnel (CA/T) project's two Charles River crossings set in motion plans to reclaim the riverfront for the public. Guided by a master plan by Carr, Lynch, and Sandell, the DCR built five major parks, and three pedestrian bridges (with several more in the planning), transforming the Lost Half Mile from a bleak postindustrial landscape dominated by transportation infrastructure into the vibrant New Charles River Basin (NCRB), fulfilling Frederick Law Olmsted protege Charles Elliot's early 20th-c. vision of connecting the Charles River to the Boston Harbor. This walking tour, led by the DCR project manager for the NCRB, the master planner for the NCRB, and landscape architects who helped implement portions of the master plan, will visit various parks and pieces, including Portal Park, Light Portal Boston, Lovejoy Wharf, South Bank Park, Paul Revere Park and its extension, North Bank underbridge plaza, the Littoral Way, North Bank Bridge, North Point Park, and Nashua Street Park, observing how each overcame the challenges posed for public space in a postindustrial 21st-c. transportation infrastructure context.
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TB3 Tour of the Revitalized Alice K. Wolf Center in Cambridge, MA Tours LU HSW
Built in 1933, 5 Western Avenue was originally the main Cambridge Police Headquarters and the V.F.W and American Legion Halls. It was used for over 75 years by the police department and various municipal offices, but had stood empty since 2008 when the police moved to a new facility. Designed by Boston architectural firm Putnam and Cox, the building is an unusual example of the Art Deco style and is a contributor to the Central Square Historic District. Finegold Alexander Associates conducted a study to determine the feasibility of renovating the building into contemporary offices for the Cambridge Housing Authority (CHA) headquarters and the City of Cambridge Human Services departments, and helped move the project forward through design to construction. The ultimate goal for the project was to completely modernize the building, providing contemporary working and teaching spaces for the CHA and Human Services, while preserving the building's historic fa¨cade. The successful adaptation of 5 Western Ave., now called the Alice K. Wolf Center, achieved LEED Gold certification, and restored the building to an active municipal facility helping to serve the needs of its community.
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9:30 AM - 11:30 AM
Session Description Track CEU
B28 Architecture that Improves People's Lives Socially Sustainable Design (Sponsored by IHCD) LU
This presentation by John McAslan will illuminate the socially sustainable design ethos of his internationally recognized architectural practice, John McAslan and Partners. "We create architecture that improves people's lives. We aim for an architecture which is rational and poetic, robust and delightful; we tread carefully and build with conviction; we tackle problems head on and think laterally; we deconstruct a brief and let a design emerge from close examination of the pieces; we don't necessarily take ‘no' for an answer; we believe the power of architecture extends much further than the dimensions of individual buildings; we believe architecture is about making life better. We believe that buildings should be underpinned by a powerful idea; that the idea should be an intelligent and logical response to functionality and a sense of place; and the power of that idea should be embedded in the built form. That way, clients get the buildings they need and society gets the architecture it deserves." Following his talk, Metropolis magazine's editor-in-chief, Susan Szenasy, will conduct a live interview with Mr. McAslan.
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10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
Session Description Track CEU
B21 SketchUp Advanced Skills Sketch-Up LU
SketchUp is a powerful tool for communicating 3D design concepts in professional workflows. The advanced topics course is designed for experienced SketchUp users who want to investigate advanced topic areas including creating curved surfaces, making complex components, managing large files, tackling intricate workflows and using time-saving extensions. SketchUp's strength is its ability to integrate with other systems. Participants will be given a thorough review of the entire design environment. Prior Skills: Pre-requisite of SketchUp Essentials 1 & SketchUp Essentials 2, or similar.
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B22 Going Global: Culture Shock ArchitectureBoston LU
It's not just professional practice that holds surprises for those working abroad, but project delivery, business customs, and the routines of daily life. Our panelists share stories from the field - the good, the bad, and the baffling - and highlight the perils and attractions of working outside your cultural comfort zone.
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B23 Design to Your Advantage: Navigating the Complexities of the MA Existing Building Code Codes and Regulations LU HSW
Close collaboration among the architectural, structural, and code disciplines is crucial very early in the design process of any proposed renovation. These teams must be able to not only quantify building deficiencies per the 780 CMR Chapter 34, but must also be able to adeptly use this information to make informed decisions regarding the most appropriate code method to adopt: the Prescriptive Method, the Work Area Method, or the Performance Method. And while the preferred method may be obvious when considering any single trade in isolation, the experienced AE team will be able to skillfully evaluate the relative merits and liabilities of this determination for the project as a whole. The successful design team will navigate the code intelligently, avoiding onerous, costly, and unnecessary code triggers. This presentation will describe the each of the three methods of evaluation allowed, identifying the pros and cons of each with respect to the structural engineering and code implications. A clear and simple decision matrix diagram will be presented to help participants navigate an otherwise complicated and convoluted path through the Existing Building Code of Massachusetts 780 CMR.
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B24 Complete Neighborhoods: Boston's Fairmount Indigo Rail Corridor Urban Scale LU HSW
For the past two years, the City of Boston has worked with the communities of the Fairmount Indigo Corridor as part of the Fairmount Indigo Planning Initiative to direct investment and improvements to this area. The 9.2 mile Fairmount Indigo MBTA Rail Corridor runs from South Station to Readville and passes through many of the City's most underserved neighborhoods, suffering from high unemployment rates, foreclosures, predatory lending, violence, and income and health disparities. Residents, businesses and community partners have advocated for transformational change in the Corridor for decades. To address the multiple issues, the Corridor Plan provides a Complete Neighborhoods approach to community building by establishing improvement strategies in six categories: prosperity, home, place, getting around, parks and public space, and quality of life. The intention is to create neighborhoods that promote well-connected, walkable, prosperous, vibrant, safe, and healthy places. This presentation will outline the Complete Neighborhoods approach to community building, provide a review of current best practices for development of Complete Neighborhoods, and provide an in-depth view into the programs and plans that Boston will use in this unique approach to transit-oriented development.
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B26 Phytoforensics and Phytotechnologies: Using Plants to Track and Clean Up Contaminants Landscape LU HSW
Plants are masters of mass transfer, harvesting water, carbon, and nutrients to be the world's dominant biomass without ever moving. Plants also remove contaminants from surrounding soil, water and air. Pollutants are also stored, making plants biosentinels in their surroundings. This session will explore these tracking and removal mechanisms and phytotechnology applications for designers.
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B27 Preparing for the Rising Tide II: Living With Water Climate Resilience LU HSW
Recently, at least four coastal storm surges have come within hours of striking Boston at high tide and bringing floodwaters 5-6 ft above high tide. While this level of flooding hasn't been seen since the Blizzard of 1978, climate change and sea level rise are increasing the frequency and intensity of storm events. Historically, cities seeking to prevent coastal flooding have used seawalls and hard engineering to keep water out. Due to repeated flooding and levee failures like those seen during Katrina, The Netherlands and other regions with a high flood risk are transitioning to what they have dubbed a "living with water" approach. The co-authors of Preparing for the Rising Tide II: Living With Water will describe the concept of living with water and provide examples of adaptation design utilizing this approach. Learn how strategies focusing on resilience rather than resistance efforts can reduce risk of catastrophic damage while providing other social benefits.
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B29 Window Design for Blast Hazard and Forced Entry Mitigation Building Enclosures LU HSW
Due to increasing terrorist threat and forced-entry violent incidents, there is growing demand for explosive blast resistance and forced entry restrictions to be incorporated into the design of building structures and envelope components. The performance of these components during an explosive blast is more geared towards mitigating the hazards caused by the blast, since most injuries and fatalities result from flying glass and debris. In response to violent forced-entry concerns, in addition to emergency response training, many facilities are instituting preventative measures, such as controlling building access and providing additional means for emergency egress. Fenestrations (windows, doors, louvers, vents) are the most vulnerable components of the building envelope, and thus susceptible to unauthorized access if proper provisions are not incorporated. Many measures can increase occupant safety, with varying levels of performance and cost. Selecting the most appropriate safety measures must involve consideration of the facility's occupant load, vulnerability, and risk. This presentation will examine various options with respect to treatment of the glazing, as well as important considerations for access control at entrances. It will also discuss recommended applications and summarize applicable building code criteria used in design.
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B30 An Energy Responsible Living Experience Case Studies and Project Types LU HSW
Residence Halls are a living laboratory where students can learn and experience a lifestyle that embodies sustainable practices. The Massachusetts State College Building Authority (MSCBA) and Bridgewater State University initiated a zero net energy building pilot study to research strategies that will advance the planning and design of this and future residence halls. This study translated into the exploration and implementation of major energy reduction ideas for Weygand Hall through design and operations. In the process, it engaged students and transformed campus policy. We will discuss the role of Facilities Management in shaping sustainable ideas and in overseeing the success of energy conservation measures.
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  • Edward H. Adelman, Executive Director, Massachusetts State College Building Authority (MSCBA)
  • Yanel de Angel, Architect, Perkins + Will
  • Amanda Forde, Director of Capital Renewal, Massachusetts State College Building Authority (MSCBA)
  • Karen W. Jason, Associate Vice President, Bridgewater State University
  • Chris Shumway, Mechanical Engineer and President, Rist-Frost-Shumway Engineering
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B31 Putting Design Research into Practice: Talking Shop with Today's Innovation Leaders The Future of Practice LU
Design research is the product of the kind of passion that powers initiative, sustained rigor, and that magical intuitive leap at the heart of innovation, often producing great architecture and industry advancement. However, in today's compressed delivery climate, research can seem elusive, expensive, and utterly academic. How do fiscally successful firms balance these pressures with the need for research within their practices? This panel assembles diverse perspectives on how to develop collective intelligence and leverage research into marketable value to clients. We will compare organizational models and symbiotic partnerships that support research. Invited panelists will unpack meaningful affinities and contrasts between the means and methods of design research most relevant to today's architectural office. Audience members will gain insight into how they implement research in their own practice. Each panelist is a thought leader that stands out for having created research infrastructures that define their firm's identity. Gina Ford has helped to restructure the way Sasaki considers urban design research. Sarah Markovitz brings deep research experience to the development of powerful new healthcare analytic tools at NBBJ. Steve Sanderson, co-founder of CASE Inc., pursues cutting-edge advances in design technology to help create solutions for client-driven problems.
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B32 Designing Profitablity Business Management and Development LU
Successful firms do more than design beautiful projects, they make money doing it! This panel will discuss the operational decisions that promote the fiscal stability and professional longevity of a design practice. Each panelist has played a pivotal role in defining the business practice of their award-winning firm and will share their perspective on how to maintain the health of an office. Attendees will hear how firms ranging in size create value for the office through both income and expenditures. Critical aspects of profitability will be covered including internal budgeting, fee negotiation and efficient production.
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B33 Renovation/Addition vs. New Construction Existing and Historic Buildings LU
When to renovate vs. build new has been a long-standing important question at many institutions with an inventory of aging buildings and a long-term capital projects plan. This panel presentation and discussion will explore many factors that contribute to this decision. By bringing together the architect and the client along with key cost estimating and construction management consultants, the issues of design, cost, constructability and schedule are examined. Can a renovation/addition for an existing building adequately convey the goals and the mission of the project for which a new building would be tailor-made? Is a renovation or addition typically less expensive than new construction? Does it take longer to design and build than new construction? What other factors contribute to this decision? Through a case study of two recent projects with very similar parameters - a renovation and addition (under construction) and a new freestanding building (in late design phase), we compare the same key issues that led to different results in each of these projects.
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  • Tom S. Chung, Principal, Leers Weinzapfel Associates
  • Ann Schiro, Deputy Director for Design & Construction, Massachusetts Division of Capital Asset Management (DCAMM)
  • Josiah Stevenson, Principal, Leers Weinzapfel Associates
  • Dennis Swinford, Director Of Campus Planning, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
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B34 Changing Tides Residential Focus LU HSW
This program is targeted specifically toward architects who design homes both on coastal plains and inland. New flood mapping legislation that was introduced in October 2013 and recent weather erosion has changed floodplains. Architects need to understand where these floodplains are and how to position or properly elevate a house in these newly mapped terrains. A civil engineer is included in the program to address the technical requirements of residential design in these high-risk areas. By working through these issues, an architect can in turn save their clients thousands of dollars in home insurance. Alternative solutions to home design in these areas will be presented as well as case studies from New England where these issues have arisen. Experts will expound on the different flood risk areas what architects can do to alleviate some of these issues before they become problems for their client as a homeowner and what to do with existing structures to accommodate the changes.
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11:30 AM - 1:00 PM
Session Description Track CEU
BSAC3 How to Renovate and Maintain your Brand
1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Session Description Track CEU
B41 SketchUp & CAD Sketch-Up LU
Nearly every design professional will need to wrestle with importing or exporting CAD to and from SketchUp. In this class, we teach you how to do both, as well as provide you several tips and tricks that are guaranteed to speed-up your SketchUp & CAD workflow. Prior skills: Pre-requisite of SketchUp Essentials 1 & SketchUp Essentials 2, or similar.
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B43 The 90-Minute MBA for the Emerging Professional For Emerging Professionals
A repeat of last year's popular seminar, this workshop will introduce basic business principles for the design profession. To succeed in today's volatile marketplace, emerging professionals must have a strong business foundation to survive and thrive. This seminar will empower the emerging professional to chart their career path to success by offering insights into how a firm is created, managed and sustained, as well as what role they can play in their firm's success. Attendees will be introduced to a number of business and management topics including: creating a design firm; marketing and business development; social media and networking; branding; financial management; understanding the importance of multipliers; project management; responding to an RFP; developing fees ; contracts; risk management; ethics and personal branding.
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B44 The New MA Energy and Stretch Codes Codes and Regulations LU HSW
Per the Green Communities Act, the 2012 IECC is now in full force and effect in Massachusetts. Because this code tracks closely with the stretch code, a new stretch energy code has been proposed. This presentation will bring you up to speed on the status and contents of these regulations.
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B45 Hybrid Vigor: The Key to Revitalizing the Midtown Cultural District Urban Scale LU HSW
Forty years after initial attempts to revitalize the commercial and entertainment heart of Boston, Lower Washington Street has finally become the vital, mixed-use 24-hour neighborhood that planners first envisioned. After a series of urban design initiatives partly succeeded in transforming the Combat Zone, it was only when a major investment at Millennium Place was completed that the transformation finally began to materialize. This presentation will examine the history of urban design tactics employed by both the City and private developers to re-energize the Midtown Cultural District, including the renovation and repurposing of historic theaters and commercial buildings. The key component to this transformation was the residential "Hybrid Building." Of the many large-scale interventions over the decades, how did this building type -- exemplified by the twin developments of Millennium Place and the redevelopment of the Filene's site -- play such a pivotal role in reconfiguring the historic commercial and cultural spine of downtown Boston? This panel presentation will provide both historical perspective on this compelling story and evaluate the merits of this building type in both the context of the re-urbanization of Boston, and in other US cities as well.
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  • David Carlson, Exec. Director, Boston Civic Design Commission, Boston Redevelopment Authority
  • Blake Middleton, Partner, Handel Architects
  • Kairos Shen, Director of Planning, Boston Redevelopment Authority
  • George Thrush, Director, Northeastern University School of Architecture
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B46 Will Your Building's Performance Satisfy Your Owner? Building Performance LU HSW
The definition of durability is the ability to endure. Your buildings must withstand both routine and raging environmental events as well as other mechanisms of deterioration. This exterior detailing workshop emphasizes both design and review knowledge and skills. We will discuss ways to reliably bring parity between the owner's service life expectations and your built results by focusing on opportunities offered during discrete phases of a project's evolution: Conceptual Design, Design Development, Pre-Construction, Construction, and Operations and Maintenance. We'll focus on material selection as it pertains to maintainable vs. inaccessible details, and discuss both in terms of value-based placement and sequence. We will examine the deterioration of materials at the micro level of a single component to a macro examination of the failure of an entire exterior building system. Regional environmental loads and other mechanisms of deterioration of materials and assemblies, including anticipated build quality, inform both design and material selection. We will discuss simple modifications to details and material choice which can dramatically affect long term durability how service life of materials is shortened during the construction process and how structured analysis and reviews can assist in material selection in light of replacement and maintenance issues.
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B47 Prefabrication Pitfalls Construction LU
Prefabrication promises incredible advances in efficiency and precision. Prefabrication of major components can produce shorter schedules, and lower construction costs, as work can be assembled offsite in more accommodating environments. But prefabrication also comes with certain hidden risks that can derail a schedule, increase costs, or cause discord amongst the labor force. This program discusses the potential perils that present the greatest risk, and offers practical suggestions to avoid these problems.
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  • Dana Anderson, Managing Principal, Perkins + Will
  • John Erb, Vice President, DeLuxe Building Systems, Inc
  • Sue Klawans, Vice President/Corporate DIrector Operational Excellence, Gilbane Building Company
  • Kenneth Rubinstein, Attorney / Co-Chair of Construction Practice Group, Preti Flaherty Beliveau & Pachios
  • Ryan Salvas, , Island International Exterior Fabricators
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B48 Designing Multi-Unit Housing for the Real 21st-century World Socially Sustainable Design (Sponsored by IHCD) LU HSW
This workshop will look at unlocking the asset of inclusive design in multi-unit housing, building upon baseline accessibility with design features that minimize limitations and facilitate independence, and forming alliances with the real estate, development and construction industries to serve an increasingly diverse and aging market. Changing demographics provide a market potential and incentive to further inclusive design. There is an opportunity to improve the current baseline of design for accessibility, identify and recognize the qualities that make a home suitable for all ages, and connect to current trends. We'll also discuss strategies to increase transparency and build consumer awareness, and collaboration with stakeholders outside the building industry, such as healthcare, who have an economic interest to provide housing that is adaptable for people of all ages. This will benefit us all personally, professionally and economically, and increase the appeal as well as the actual and experiential quality of multi-unit housing. Presenters will share global and US model projects and explore the impediments to moving forward.
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B49 Adding Air Barrier and Thermal Improvements to Existing Facilities Building Enclosures LU HSW
Many existing buildings were constructed before current energy and building codes required a continuous air and vapor barrier, and exterior insulation.To improve the thermal performance and interior air quality of these facilities, many building owners are looking to upgrade their existing infrastructure. The presenter recently completed evaluations of several existing higher education facilities with a focus on improving the exterior building enclosures. The presentation will provide an in-depth examination of design considerations, with a focus on addressing ongoing air and moisture infiltration caused by the lack of continuous air barriers and thermal insulation. The presentation will discuss unique solutions to improve the overall building performances and aesthetics, and coordinate construction in an occupied facility. Attendees can expect to learn the steps that can be performed at their own facilities to improve building performance.
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B50 A Living Building Challenge Hotspot in Western Massachusetts Case Studies and Project Types LU HSW
The Living Building Challenge is the built environment's most rigorous performance standard. It calls for "the creation of building projects… that operate as cleanly, beautifully and efficiently as nature's architecture." To be certified under the Challenge, projects must meet a series of ambitious performance requirements, including the Red List for materials, net zero energy and net zero waste and water. In Western Massachusetts, four institutions have elected to engage the Living Building Challenge, representing one of the densest and deepest commitments to the LBC anywhere. Within a thirty-mile radius, the Smith College Bechtel Environmental Classroom recently became the fifth building be certified, the Kellogg House at Williams College is under construction, and both the Hampshire College Portal Building and Hitchcock Center for the Environment are in the advanced stages of design and strategic planning. Design and sustainability professionals from each team will share their experiences and discuss the approaches, obstacles, and solutions associated with their pursuit of the LBC's demanding performance standard for site, water, energy, health, materials, equity, and beauty.
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B51 Optimizing the Terrain: More Program, Less Mass Existing and Historic Buildings LU HSW
Planning and designing for growth in constrained settings while preserving greenspace is a challenge for many institutions. This panel discussion will highlight two academic case studies where combining strategies for existing building reuse and below-grade construction accommodated institutional programming goals. These interventions added new infrastructure to create "found" space in unconventional ways and maintained or expanded campus greenspace to better connect academic programs to the larger institutional campus. Cornell University Law School's new Academic Center added significant program and maintained iconic landscapes and vistas without expanding the visible building footprint. The Center exceeds the University's standards for sustainable design and energy goals through utilization of the building's thermal mass, envelope design and air distribution. At the University of Chicago, a new Academic Precinct was planned and designed in conjunction with the University's Strategic Sustainability Plan. Through the adaptive reuse of existing buildings, integration of new greenspace, limitation of new footprint, and integration of below-grade construction, the building is on track to exceed the University and project team's goals for energy performance, and provides the University with a new global center for Economics.
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B52 A Design Professional's Guide for Getting Paid Business Management and Development LU
All too often design professionals provide good services on a project but - for a variety of reasons - do not get paid in full for those services. The purpose of this seminar is to provide design professionals with the tools and knowledge they need to receive appropriate compensation for services rendered. In this seminar attendees will learn: what important contract provisions to include in their contracts (and which to avoid), how to create and preserve leverage, how to detect warning signs, what not to do, how to obtain security, how lien laws work, the pros and cons of filing suit, and insurance implications.
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B53 Affordable, Net Zero, Modular: Chasing The Golden Trifecta, Scraping Knees Along the Way Residential Focus LU HSW
Kaplan Thompson Architects' first net zero project, BrightBuilt Barn, evolved into BrightBuilt Home, a line of modular Net Zero homes. The goal was to make a series of high-performance houses available to a wider market interested in affordability, accessibility, construction speed and design. We will discuss the changes in our typical details that these homes have required, share critical demographics insights, speed bumps in the process and tradeoffs required to produce high-performance homes with predictable results despite a myriad of new variables.
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B54 Perspectives on Design and Mixed Income Housing (Chapter 40B) Multifamily Housing LU
This session will focus on design practices that lead to appropriate solutions for mixed income housing developments in sensitive physical and political contexts. To ensure the distribution of affordable housing, Massachusetts statute Chapter 40B enables mixed income housing development that varies from local zoning and design standards in many circumstances. In a state where development approvals can be difficult to achieve for multi-family projects, a substantial portion of the new multi-family housing in the state is developed using the Chapter 40B mechanism. The development process can be contentious. Design often becomes a critical focus of reviews, negotiations, and approvals. This workshop will explore the different perspectives of developers, architects, site designers, state agencies, and local communities as they seek successful, well-designed outcomes. The presentation will include the Commonwealth's handbook and design guidelines for Chapter 40B projects and consider several case studies of successful design approaches that balance increased density with the character of their sites and the communities that surround them. The case studies will include the role of design in developments that have enjoyed community support (friendly 40B projects) and how design was a focus of other projects that have faced community opposition.
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B55 Cut Your Losses: Envelope Performance and Thermal Comfort Building Performance LU HSW
In the U. S., thermal comfort is primarily controlled by mechanical means, allowing these systems to compensate for shortcomings in envelope performance. With rising energy costs and increased focus on creating healthy environments, this model is due for reconsideration. Thermal comfort for building occupants around glazed openings is an important design consideration, as the amount of glazing and the performance criteria (U-factor) can drive the need for perimeter heating. We calculated the effect of different glazing configurations on mean radiant temperature, and through occupancy surveys determined real-world clothing insulation values. Using this data, we were able to set a thermal comfort threshold and establish the makeup of comfortable spaces without the need for perimeter heating at various exterior temperatures. Information on downdrafts that can occur through convection along tall, cold surfaces was overlaid for a more complete picture. Additionally, to address thermal bridging, we used an infrared camera to analyze the thermal performance of fifteen built projects to establish real-world data about interior surface temperature. This session will link information gathered from post-occupancy studies, field measurements and modeling to understand how the radiant temperature of walls inside a space can be predicted and used to ensure comfortable environments.
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SB13 WID Awards Luncheon Women in Design Symposium
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SB2 Design Charrette: Living With Water
It's a familiar refrain: if Superstorm Sandy had hit a few hours earlier (or later), Boston, too, would have flooded. Scientists know that seas are rising, storm severity is increasing, and that coastal cities need to grapple with an increasingly wet world. The Boston Harbor Association argues Living With Water is the way forward. On Sandy's second anniversary, join us for a hands on design workshop to imagine what this might mean at a variety of locations where the city meets the sea. This Charrette is one component of a slate of ABX workshops about resiliency, and complements the larger design competition organized by the City of Boston, Boston Redevelopment Authority, Coastal Zone Management and the Boston Harbor Association. Free and open to the public. CEU credit by self-report.
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3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Session Description Track CEU
BSAC4 Just My Type: Pencil to Pixel
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Session Description Track CEU
B61 SketchUp & Shaderlight for Photorealistic Renderings Sketch-Up LU
As an interactive, photorealistic renderer for Google SketchUp, Shaderlight lets you render great images quickly and simply. Fully integrated in to SketchUp and SketchUp Pro, Shaderlight provides the tools every SketchUp user needs to achieve their vision with minimum fuss. Prior skills: Pre-requisite of SketchUp Essentials 1 & SketchUp Essentials 2, or similar.
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B62 Evolutions in Adaptive Reuse For Emerging Professionals
As more buildings reach the end of their useful lives, architects have gained a deeper and more complex understanding of how to transform them creatively. In this session, presenters will review the history of adaptive reuse, discuss a variety of ways to design transformations of old buildings, and provide insight on how the changing faces of preservation, sustainability, and building technology have affected the practice of adaptive reuse. Several case studies will be used to guide the discussion: the reuse of an underutilized military base, an historic church recomposed as part of an art college, a power plant transformed into a student gathering place, and a mid-century modern tower reinvented for a law school. The discussion will identify common threads that apply to old buildings regardless of cultural value -- whether working with a historic resource, an iconic mid-century modern building, or a forgotten shell.
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  • Jason Forney, Principal, Bruner/Cott & Associates, Inc.
  • Aoife Morris, Sr Project Manager, Bruner/Cott & Associates, Inc.
  • Henry Moss, Principal, Bruner/Cott & Associates, Inc.
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B63 Dirty Dirt? How New Environmental Rules Will Change Design and Development Codes and Regulations LU HSW
The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MADEP) has announced sweeping amendments to the Massachusetts Contingency Plan (MCP), the regulations that prescribe standards and procedures for cleaning up contaminated sites. The DEP's amendments are comprehensive. Many reflect advances in scientific knowledge, including new toxicity data and better understanding of contaminant behavior. Others reflect changes in MADEP's priorities, particularly its heightened concern about vapor intrusion, and its overall goal of increasing regulatory efficiency. Many of the changes may provide greater flexibility for reaching regulatory closure, particularly on urban fill sites. Others will make reaching closure more cumbersome and costly. Find out how these changes will affect design and construction on a "dirty" site.
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B64 Victims of Fashion: Architectural Styles that Shaped Boston's History and Future Urban Scale LU
Boston has been shaped by distinctive architectural styles and values established by many eras of our long history. From the standpoint of materials, the city's early wooden structures were supplanted by brick and granite, then steel, glass and concrete. Over the same historical arc, many urban strategies have been applied, from the English streets and squares of Charles Bulfinch's time to the French influence of Haussmann to diverse modernist visions for renewal. Some styles remain controversial, while others are beloved, yet few observers pause to examine how these differing reactions evolve from generation to generation. Victorian-era ornamentation and twentieth-century Brutalism, for instance, both exemplify a natural cycle: starting with a widespread presence, then going out of fashion (often after being roundly criticized), and eventually re-emerging in a new light. This session collects a diverse group of historians, architects and preservationists to react to Boston's stylistic flux. By examining how style and value systems have shaped Boston, this panel will foster a discussion on how our history might foreshadow the ways our hometown will evolve in the future.
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B65 Owning the Air: Controlling and Verifying Commercial Building Infiltration Building Performance LU HSW
Controlling air movement is an important design and construction issue for all building types. Reducing air leakage can have a significant impact on durability, comfort, and energy efficiency. Increasingly, organizations such as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and building codes, including the2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), are mandating building enclosure airtightness performance metrics. This session will examine how to ensure that the appropriate air barrier details are included in building plans and specifications to achieve air barrier continuity. We will review the performance metrics associated with whole building testing and describe the protocols for testing a commercial building. Case studies from recent buildings ranging up to 200,000 sf will be used to illustrate the testing process and discuss lessons learned. Finally, the methodology and results of the ASHRAE 1478 research study will be presented. This multi-year project, published in 2014, involved the collection of leakage data on sixteen commercial buildings between four and fourteen stories built since the year 2000 in climates zones two through seven. Additional investigations, such as leakage due to HVAC penetrations, will also be discussed.
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  • Matt Root, Senior Project Manager, Conservation Services Group
  • Joe Standley, Associate III, Wiss, Janney, Eltsner Associates, Inc.
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B66 Collaboration in Public Projects Construction LU
While the public sector has been slow to adopt the more collaborative delivery systems such as CM-At Risk and Design Build, legislative changes now allow many New England states and municipalities to use these systems. This presentation offers real-life discussions of collaborative projects involving public owners. The panelists will discuss the challenges and advantages that these projects faced, and the strategies they employed to address these issues.
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  • Edward Everitt, Associate General Counsel, CB&I
  • Ryan Hutchins, Sr. Vice President, Gilbane Building Company
  • Jack McCarthy, Executive Director, Massachusetts School Building Authority
  • Kenneth Rubinstein, Attorney / Co-Chair of Construction Practice Group, Preti Flaherty Beliveau & Pachios
  • Brooke Trivas, K-12 Education Market Leader, Boston, Perkins + Will
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B67 Climate Resilient Housing Prototypes Climate Resilience LU HSW
Post-Hurricane Sandy, New England's shoreline has become a different place. Rising tides have resulted in a new set of FEMA guidelines and maps that now place many developed urban areas within flood zones. FEMA and building code standards for flood-resistant construction require new or substantially improved buildings in flood zones to be elevated or flood-proofed above projected flood levels. However, elevating buildings more than a few feet above the sidewalk can have negative effects on streetscape, building access, ground floor activity, architectural quality, and neighborhood character. Adapting to higher standards of flood safety is both a challenge and a design opportunity. This session will explore emerging urban design principles and design trends to guide the design of flood-resilient multi-family structures. HafenCity in Hamburg, Germany, a new district designed according to resiliency principles, will be examined as a typology for this type of construction. Specific recommendations from the New York City Planning Department's "Designing for Flood Risk" in urban areas will be outlined. We will also review a series of multi-family projects that have begun to incorporate flood resilience into their design.
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B68 Designing Facilitating Environments in Higher Education Socially Sustainable Design (Sponsored by IHCD) LU HSW
Higher education in the US is no longer about a predictable group of young people progressing in a straight line from high school to college to work. Today 85% of students in higher education are non-traditional in every possible way. They may be older, from communities of color, immigrants, first-generation-to-college, veterans, and people with disabilities. Students with disabilities in higher education are characterized by a more diverse range of functional limitations than ever before. Given the prevalence of non-apparent conditions, they may not self-identify to Disability Services. Individual accommodation will inevitably fall short of the vision of inclusive education. Design for equal opportunity and participation demands a more engaged process of understanding needs and opportunities in environments that facilitate the performance of all students. "Just tell me what I have to do" to comply with the federal civil rights laws and the state accessibility code is a floor, but it's inadequate to achieve the supportive environments we need today. A more dynamic appreciation of the ordinariness of difference and the power of design to facilitate experience will help redesign higher education to align with today's students.
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  • Emmanuel Andrade, Architectural Designer, Institute for Human Centered Design
  • Zuzana Ceresnova, Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Architecture, Slovak University of Technology
  • Polly Welch, Senior Project Manager, Massachusetts Division of Capital Asset Management (DCAMM)
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B69 God is in the DETAILS: A Case Study Review of Non-Traditional Facade Detailing Building Enclosures LU HSW
The session is a case study-driven review of facade details. A review of the basic stock details may miss critical design issues that occur under atypical conditions. The basic rules of thumb do not apply when the geometry or the material choice require more from the design. The session will review atypical conditions and the challenges that tend to occur away from the idealized conditions. The course is crucial to those designing building enclosures that do not fit the mold of a common box. The case studies will include both transparent and opaque facade systems. Most importantly the discussion will include the junction of the transparent and the opaque assemblies, where most facade failures occur. Important topics will include continuous insulation, mitigation of thermal bridges, condensation, waterproofing and structure. Case studies will include recent P/A award winner Liverpool Insurgentes, Marquez Hall at the Colorado School of Mines, Cineteca Nacional, Mexican National Film Center, Charleston International Airport, Jackson Hole International Airport and the Ralph Carr Justice Center.
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B70 Designing a "Net Zero Ready" Building on a Shoestring: You Can Do It, Too Case Studies and Project Types LU HSW
When Rhode Island's Newport School District initiated a planning process to build a new 105,000 sf PK-4 school, one of the goals was to design an efficient facility with low operating costs and easily-maintained systems within a modest construction budget. The design team set out to lower the school's energy costs by selecting easily available, proven technologies and mainstream MEP systems, and applied an integrated holistic design approach to every design decision. The result is the new Pell Elementary School, which provides an engaging, hands-on, child-friendly learning environment that fosters collaboration while achieving superior energy performance, projected at 35 Kbtu/sf/year - within the range of Net Zero Ready, all for $237/sf.
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B71 A Design Interrogation of Workplace Culture Design Thinking and New Directions LU
Competition has always motivated academic and medical institutions to live in the future and strive to be the best, so why are their workplaces living in the past? Challenges and opportunities exist culturally and financially, leaving the leaders of these institutions asking what tomorrow's workplace will look like, and how they will get there. One size does not fit all, and a well-conceived workplace must not only support but influence culture, leaving designers to walk the line between inspired strategies and ones that cause culture shock. Discussion will be spurred by questions such as: What drives the design of these workplaces? Are they shaped more by cultural expectations than need? Should these workplaces really be located on campus, and how does their placement affect the bottom line? How did the corporate/commercial sector adapt their culture to the workplace of the 21st century, or did their culture shift first? With panelists from medical and academic institutions, we'll confront the problems and discover how these workplaces may move into the future.
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B72 Design, Impact and Meaning: Emerging Models of Socially Entrepreneurial Design The Future of Practice LU
The past two decades have seen the boundaries between for-profit and nonprofit increasingly blurred, in both design and the wider market. Design practitioners are experimenting with and producing new models that hybridize social impact and financial sustainability in creative ways. This session presents business models and shares the strategies and tactics that some of these emerging practices use to make impact and achieve financial stability. These insights, based on interviews with more than fifteen practices, including for-profits such as Utile and Interboro Partners ands nonprofits such as MASS Design and Ideo.org, illustrate the widening array of choices available to design practitioners interested in social impact. The goal of the session is to share and disseminate strategies that practitioners can use to 'remix' and alter their practices--reshaping them to leverage design to achieve social good. The session draws on the research of Proactive Practices, a research collaborative co-founded in 2012 to investigate emerging models of socially entrepreneurial design, and to shed light on the larger question of how innovations in this sector are redefining the scope of traditional design processes.
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  • Gilad Meron, Design Researcher & Strategist, Enterprise Community Partners & The Autodesk Foundation
  • Mia Scharphie, Landscape Designer, Proactive Practices Research
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B73 Limitations and Opportunities of Adapting Historic Landmark Structures: Two Case Studies Existing and Historic Buildings LU HSW
Navigating the challenges of working with a landmarked historic building can leave project teams frustrated to identify creative opportunities. Using two case studies of historic landmarked institutional buildings: Lesley University College of Art and Design Lunder Arts Center in Cambridge, MA, and Vanderbilt University Alumni Hall in Nashville, TN, we will show how establishing preservation goals at the outset of a project can guide designers and owners to balanced, sensitive, and detailed preservation with innovative and unexpected interventions. Under-developed or vague preservation goals can misdirect project development; clear goals set a course for refined preservation response and can allow the owner to realize unique interventions that complement the building's historic character. We will demonstrate through these case studies how thoughtful use of contemporary craftsmanship and expertise -- in timber framing, stained glass, stone and brick masonry, and millwork -- in combination with available new technologies, allows designers to respond to the critical needs of delicate restoration while also affording creative freedom.
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  • Nat Crosby, Senior Project Manager, Bruner/ Cott & Associates, Inc.
  • Robert Simmons, Principle, Bruner/ Cott & Associates, Inc.
  • Nurit Zuker, Senior Project Manager, Bruner/ Cott & Associates, Inc.
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4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Session Description Track CEU
SB14 WID Happy Hour
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4:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Session Description Track CEU
SB15 Emerging Professionals "Mix and Mentor"
Join us in The Quad for an evening of networking with fellow Emerging Professionals and top leaders in the architecture industry. This event will offer one-on-one speed mentoring with seasoned architects as well as casual mentoring among your peers. This is your opportunity to impress the best so come prepared with questions!
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5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Session Description Track CEU
SB4 Society of Marketing Professional Services (SMPS), Boston Chapter Reception
Join the Boston Chapter of the Society for Marketing Professional Services (SMPS) for informal networking, lively conversation and fantastic raffle prizes. We are fortunate to have Ron Worth, CEO of SMPS, and Barbara Shuck, SMPS President, attending the conference and reception. If you’re a current, new, or prospective SMPS Boston member, join us to learn where the association leadership is taking SMPS this upcoming year and into the future.
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SB5 Rensselaer Alumni Reception
Dean Evan Douglis, School of Architecture, and the Office of Alumni Relations invite you to join us for a complimentary reception. This is a great opportunity to gather, network and exchange ideas with other Rensselaer alumni. Anyone in the building trades industry is welcome.
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5:30 PM - 8:30 PM
Session Description Track CEU
SB3 BIM and Omniclass - Project Management for the 21st Century LU
Omniclass is a system for managing project information throughout the project lifecycle. Regardless of whether your office uses BIM, CAD or draws by hand, Omniclass contains benefits for any existing workflow. While some may only implement one or two tables, others find benefit in leveraging the entire structure. Just as migrating to 6 digit MasterFormat, and transitioning to BIM took effort, adopting Omniclass requires a similar level of understanding. This session intends to bring Omniclass to the forefront of the attendees mind, show them where and how Omniclass can further their organization, and how much effort it will take to see the benefit.
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6:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Session Description Track CEU
B81 Enhancing Cultural Experience by Designing for Inclusion Socially Sustainable Design (Sponsored by IHCD) LU HSW
When considering what matters most to the extraordinarily varied cultural community today and looking ahead, two priorities are guaranteed to be on every organization's short list: building a bigger audience and offering the best possible experience for everyone. How can architecture and design help? This session suggests a focus on the phenomenon of 21st- century human diversity as a means toward achieving more welcoming but also richer and more satisfying cultural experiences. It is our collective good fortune that we survive more and live longer than ever before, but it's time to get beyond mere accommodation. The numbers are too large and needs too varied. Population demographics demand fresh strategies for meeting substantive differences in physical, sensory and brain-based functions among audiences. This session includes pioneers who are flipping old habits of ‘just tell me what I have to do' to accommodate people with differences to designing environments that offer everyone more choices, more ways to deepen the cultural experience. Topics will include new, existing, and historic settings, and considerations of physical space, interactive media and multi-sensory programming.
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  • Misa Lund, Ideas Workshop Leader, wHY Architecture
  • Janice Majewski, Advisor, Inclusive Culture and Development, Institute for Human Centered Design
  • Margaret Matz, President, Milestone Architecture, PLLC
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B82 Pathways to Leadership: Small, Medium, Large For Emerging Professionals
What are the expectations, commitments, and deliverables from those seeking leadership roles? A panel discussion of principals from firms of various sizes and business models reveals different pathways to leadership through design, project management, building science, sustainability and business development. We will also consider opportunities to enrich one's professional development outside practice, through participation in professional organizations, academia, community outreach or other venues. Each panelist will address the challenges, opportunities and means to achieve the appropriate equilibrium between competing expectations for success.
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B83 Exemplar for Zero Net Energy Office Buildings: Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife Field Headquarters Case Studies and Project Types LU HSW
Bringing public leadership to high-performance design, the new Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife Field Headquarters is one of three projects selected to become the first public sector zero net energy buildings in the Commonwealth, as envisioned by the Governor's Zero Net Energy Task Force. As an exemplar, it will help the Commonwealth develop standard practices and specifications for achieving high performance building. Multiple state agencies worked together to develop the vision for this project, setting the bar for this ambitious design. Design for zero net begins with careful use of the site. Loads are driven down through a carefully detailed building envelope and state- of- the-art, efficient mechanical systems design, and energy use will be offset with a rooftop photovoltaic array, producing as much energy as the building uses annually. Construction of the project required dedication to key design aspects, as well as testing and commissioning. With the building now completed, achieving the goal of zero net energy will rely largely on how the facility is used and operated. DCAMM is undertaking a maintenance role with a close eye on energy consumption in relation to production.
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B84 Documentary Video Making as a Tool for Design Research The Future of Practice LU
We live in an age of ubiquitous computing and shortening attention spans, TED talks, YouTube, Vimeo, Vine and immersive computer environments. Architects, planners and urban designers need to be conversant in the language of the moving image as a tool for research, and to better represent ideas to our clients and future end-users. As video-making is becoming a more established part of our skillset and offering, we need to generate and disseminate our own messages with clarity and intelligence, as well as critically engage with others' work. Presenter Nick Hornig believes this medium is at its most potent when it provides the opportunity to give voice to people who are not normally heard and to expose environments that are often ignored, furthering the social responsibility of our profession. This session will outline the methods used as he has embraced video as part of his own practice over the last 14 years. Nick will outline the qualitative research fundamentals that will help other architects frame their own video projects, and explore contemporary trends that are reshaping modern documentary in the form of interactive story-telling and game-playing.
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B85 Single-Glazed Curtain Walls: Repair, Re-Clad, Over-Clad? Existing and Historic Buildings LU HSW
Single-glazed curtain walls are currently at the forefront of debate about the future of this once-pioneering technology in the metropolitan marketplace for high-performance office buildings. To date, the debates have focused on aesthetics, energy-consumption and the redevelopment potential of the land where most stand. However, there have been few discussions about the full range of options available to enhance the appeal of single-glazed curtain walls, improve their low environmental performance and address safety concerns regarding this Modern facade technology. Using case studies, the presentation will explore the options available for intervening on this facade technology, as well as assessment tools to evaluate the proposed interventions regarding environmental performance, energy code compliance, safety, aesthetics, cost and historic appropriateness.
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B86 Green Multifamily Housing Update 2014: Programs, Technology and Results Multifamily Housing LU HSW
Multifamily housing is the largest segment of the green residential market, despite the fact that most green programs initially targeted single family homebuilders. This session will provide a comprehensive update to the status and trends in green multifamily housing. The Program update covers the most popular green building programs for multifamily housing and describes when each might be most advantageous. Programs include LEED for New Construction, LEED for Homes and the Multifamily Mid-Rise adaptation, ENERGY STAR Homes and the Multifamily High Rise adaptation, the National Green Building Standard, the Living Buildings Challenge, Passive House and the Enterprise Green Communities Criteria. The Technology update tackles the single most pressing technical issue in multifamily buildings: ventilation. Strategies for build-tight, ventilate-right suitable for multifamily housing will be presented, along with research findings that illustrate the cost-effectiveness of various strategies. The Results update will use post-occupancy studies of completed multifamily buildings to illustrate actual vs predicted energy savings, as well as occupant and owner feedback on the benefits and challenges of green multifamily housing. The session will also include Q&A.
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  • Maureen Mahle, Director of Sustainable Housing Services, Steven Winter Associates, Inc.
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SB1 Wentworth Institute of Technology Alumni Reception
Join us for this Wentworth tradition by the waterfront. Wentworth alumni, friends and parents are welcome to attend our ABX alumni reception following a day at the BCEC. Networking, an Institute update and an exchange of ideas are all part of this alumni program.
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SB10 Autodesk Reception and Roundtable
This event combines a networking happy hour with industry and Autodesk experts followed by interactive roundtable discussions on business and technology. Local firm leaders will discuss ideas and innovations from the BSA`s March Business Model symposium. A panel of Autodesk experts will be on hand to respond to questions and discuss New Technology Models for Practice.
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SB11 Lessons from Beacon Yards: Framing Urban Design Workshops to Maximize their Impact
This past September, the BSA launched the inaugural Urban Design Workshop, in which two interdisciplinary design teams, led by Alex Krieger FAIA and Kishore Varanasi, explored the city building opportunities of the Beacon Yards site -- the 140 acres of former rail yards adjacent to the Allston/Cambridge interchange on the Massachusetts Turnpike. The Massachusetts Department of Transportation is currently planning the redesign of the Pike as it crosses this area, and Governor Patrick just announced that the State will build a new West Station commuter rail hub as part of the project. How MassDOT configures the infrastructure will determine whether the rail yard can become a thriving urban neighborhood. Join us as Alex Krieger FAIA, and Kishore Varanasi, and workshop organizer Tim Love AIA, discuss the scenarios generated for Beacon Yards within the context of MassDOT's on-going work and the relation to trends in large-scale urban design. Taking lessons from the Beacon Yards charrette, the panelists will also consider how future BSA Urban Design Workshops might be modified to maximize their impact.
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SB6 Roger Williams Alumni Reception
Join fellow alumni, faculty, staff and students from the School of Architecture, Art & Historic Preservation for an evening of engaging conversation, networking, and updates about the University.
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SB7 Syracuse Alumni Reception
Last year’s inaugural event was a great success, let’s keep that momentum going again this year. All Syracuse University Alumni and spouses/significant others are welcome. We will again be taking submissions for current work, built or un-built, at any stage, to present at the Reception. For questions, or to submit work, please contact Scott Mandeville at the following address, sbmandeville@gmail.com. Hope to see you all there.
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SB8 University of Cincinnati Alumni Reception
Join fellow alumni from the College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning for a lively evening of conversation, connection and, of course, our annual Skyline Chili raffle.
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SB9 Boston Architectural College Alumni & Friends Reception
Join the Boston Architectural College for our annual Alumni & Friends reception at ABX!
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Thursday, October 30, 2014
8:00 AM - 9:30 AM
Session Description Track CEU
C01 Most Common Code Mistakes Codes and Regulations LU HSW
This seminar reviews the most common building code mistakes we have encountered in our work. Issues include mistaken interpretations, common oversights, and common variances which are assumed to be allowed as-of-right. We will review example cases for many of the issues to demonstrate the impact these mistakes can have on a project. Code provisions for new and existing buildings will be addressed.
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C02 Designing for Equity Urban Scale LU
Boston, like many American cities, is experiencing a renaissance as residents and businesses return to the urban core, spurring new investment and development. However, there are growing concerns about increasing economic and social disparity as the cost of living rises, with negative impacts for middle- and working-class individuals and families. Mayor Walsh has made the issue of equity central to his agenda. As local and national conversations focus on this issue, questions are emerging about the implications for the built environment -- housing, parks and green space, transportation and infrastructure -- and the role of architects and planners. Is it possible to design for equity? How do we ensure that that investment and growth benefit all neighborhoods and residents? Join the Bruner Foundation, sponsor of the Rudy Bruner Award for Urban Excellence, for a moderated panel discussion that considers these questions. We will hear from people working in communities, nonprofits and the public sector, and learn about the challenges and opportunities they encounter. We will highlight examples of initiatives that are addressing urban equity via the built environment, and consider the role of the design profession in developing new ideas and approaches.
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  • Richard Dimino, President & CEO, A Better City
  • Ted Landsmark, Board of Directors, Boston Redevelopment Authority
  • Gail Latimore, Executive Director, Codman Square Neighborhood Development Corp
  • Anne-Marie Lubenau, Director, Rudy Bruner Award for Urban Excellence, Bruner Foundation
  • Marc Norman, Director, UPSTATE, a Center for Design Research and Real Estate at Syracuse University School of Architecture
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C03 Commissioning for Success Building Performance LU HSW
Commissioning is more than another series of tests and verifications toward the end of the construction process. It is a living and adapting process that can be implemented throughout the entire lifespan of a building. Many facilities typically complete only repairs with the shortest return on investment, but research indicates that minor repairs, deferred maintenance and capital improvements are necessary to maximize utility reductions. The research we'll report leads directly to recommendations that facilities be commissioned when constructed; be retro-commissioned if never commissioned; be recommissioned every 2 to 4 years; implement the majority of Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs); and implement continuous-commissioning. This session examines the average payback of nine commissioning efforts as well as the Energy Use Intensity (EUI) of twenty-three federal hospital facilities, some with and some without commissioning. This analysis reveals that not only is it cost effective to implement commissioning and the minor repairs, deferred maintenance and utility monitoring the process recommends, but that the savings from carrying out minor ECMs will generate enough savings to fund more major energy-saving capital improvements.
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  • Wes Stanhope, Senior Field Project Manager, Conservation Services Group
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C04 The Boston Underground: A Cautionary Tale About The Mysteries That Lurk Beneath The Surface Construction LU HSW
Significant parts of Massachusetts, including much of Boston and Cambridge, are built on filled land. How and where Boston was filled affects both the design and construction of your project. Building on filled land increases risks and uncertainty, since what is underground is never really known until you dig it up. The characteristics of this fill can affect your programing choices and foundation selection. Obstructions, contaminated soils and groundwater can significantly affect construction costs. Dropping groundwater levels require remedies. Various types of monitoring including dust, odor, vibrations and settlement must often be conducted. This workshop will delve into the various issues associated with filled land and how the design team can evaluate and mitigate potential challenges.
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C05 Acoustic and Vibration Isolation in Multi-family Residences Sound and Light LU HSW
Can you hear the stereo in the next apartment over, or the footsteps of your neighbors from the condo above yours? Are you bothered by the subway every time it rumbles by? According to the International Building Code, partitions and constructions between residences should have a minimum Sound Transmission Class (STC) of 50 and a minimum Impact Insulation Class (IIC) of 50 (45 if field is measured). This language has been adopted by many state building codes, including Massachusetts. Vibration from underground rail lines can be an important source of environmental sound and vibration in residential buildings. The characteristic low-frequency rumble from passing subway trains can be a source of annoyance. Methods exist to predict the levels of noise and vibration from rail operations in new buildings, and the probability that a resident would be annoyed by that vibration/noise.
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C06 Avoiding Pitfalls With Spray Foam Insulation Building Enclosures LU HSW
The use of spray polyurethane foam insulation in building construction has increased dramatically over the past decade because of its superior insulating qualities, performance and ability to provide all four barriers needed to effectively separate the interior environment from the exterior environment. As expected, problems have arisen due to improper installation equipment and techniques, a lack of understanding of the properties of the material and improper detailing. We will address these issues as well as show how spray foam provides the most effective means to comply with the 2012 IECC insulation requirements.
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C07 The Art of Textile Architecture: How to Design, Specify and Manage Sculptural Tension Fabric Projects Case Studies and Project Types LU
Our goal is to help you initiate and complete projects that 1) exploit the sculptural design potential of tension fabric, 2) are safe and meet structural and fire codes, 3) are affordable and stay on schedule and on budget, 4) beautify their surroundings for a long time and 5) simultaneously serve other purposes (such as shade, environmental graphics, acoustic remediation, daylighting, projection and illumination) when desired. We will use a combination of project case studies, hands-on demonstrations, and both computer and physical models to greatly increase your understanding and appreciation of architectural tension fabric. The presenters are fabric artists/ architects with extensive experience: Charles Duvall with exterior fabric constructions, and Cynthia Thompson with interior projects. They have collaborated many times over the past thirty years, and have joined forces for this workshop in order to further architects' and designers' understanding of sculptural textile architecture.
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C08 The Who, What, Where and Why of Effective User Meetings Business Management and Development LU
Effective engagement with user groups is a key to a successful design process. In the initial stages of design, it is critical to identify the key decision makers, establish collective expectations, and develop a clear presentation method to achieve design buy-in. Dominant personality types and personal interests can shape a user group dynamic and lead to missed opportunities. A lack of understanding of architectural plans and elevations can create obstacles to users feeling fully invested in the design process. Using real examples primarily from healthcare and science research projects, the panelists will discuss strategies that can be applied at different stages of the project and across program types. Design Process - discuss how designers can engage users actively and empower them to contribute collaboratively to the project, and demonstrate latest interactive tools that are highly dynamic in communicating ideas and soliciting feedback Expectations Management - how to achieve the optimal group dynamics and confidence within the limitations of time and budget Decision Making - outline the steps to attain consensus, document the process and establish responsibilities for implementation.
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C09 Stacking it Up: Modular Housing Multifamily Housing LU
Modular housing is making a mark in urban environments. From New York to San Francisco, modular housing is being built in downtown neighborhoods. What are the challenges and benefits that architects and developers must understand as modular building becomes a realistic option for the housing market? How do costs compare to more typical wood framing? This panel, composed of leaders in design, development, fabrication and construction of modular housing, will explore the fundamentals of design, delivery and installation.
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C10 Confronting Boston's Climate Related Challenges While Respecting its History Climate Resilience LU HSW
Existing historic buildings are inherently resilient, be it through beauty and design, functionality, or their ability to withstand the test of time. This panel discussion will explore Boston's unique challenges as a coastal city built predominantly on fill, and its invaluable historic fabric, which is increasingly under threat by New England's changing climate and transgression of the oceans. Lessons from the past, as well as paths currently being taken, will be highlighted at both the building and city scale.
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9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
Session Description Track CEU
TC2 A Case Study of the Dudley Square Municipal Building Tours LU
An international design team and highly experienced construction and consulting firms came together for the successful creation of the 96 million Dudley Square Municipal Building in Boston. Sasaki Associates, in collaboration with the Netherlands-based design firm Mecanoo, worked with the City of Boston to design this municipal office and retail building located in the heart of Dudley Square. The panel will discuss how this facility fulfilled former Mayor Menino's Dudley Square Vision Project, and how the goal to revitalize a once-thriving urban neighborhood and mass transit hub rich with culture and history was realized. With a blend of past and present, the facility preserves and incorporates the iconic Ferdinand Furniture Building, a symbol of the Square's historic commercial vitality.
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TC3 ***CANCELLED***ConRAC - The Future of Airport Ground Transportation Arrives! Tours LU HSW
This is a 45-minute presentation on the ConRAC Design, Construction and Operation, followed by a tour of the facility. The Massachusetts Port Authority is completing the new 310 million Rental Car Center at Boston Logan International Airport. The 120,000 sf customer service center and four level garage will have space for all nine rental car companies that have operating agreements with Logan to work in one common building. The RCC includes a new unified shuttle bus system operated by Massport. On Sept. 25, 2014 diesel powered rental car buses were eliminated entirely from the airport roadway, reducing bus traffic from about 100 buses per hour to 28 fuel efficient clean hybrid buses. As a result, shuttle bus vehicle miles are expected to drop by 70 percent with an accompanying 35% decline in airport-related emissions. The RCC was designed to achieve LEED Silver certification by the U.S. Green Building Council. The new facility features 616 solar panels on the roof of the garage providing 150 kilo watts of power. The LEED rating system offers certification levels for new construction that correspond to green design categories: sustainable sites, water efficiency, energy and atmosphere, materials and resources and indoor environmental quality. Along with rental car operations, the RCC also has a community meeting room for East Boston residents.
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9:30 AM - 11:00 AM
Session Description Track CEU
TC1 What is it about the Arts? Transforming Public Space Through Building for the Studio Arts Tours LU
Studio Arts Buildings for art-making and art instruction historically have been significant structures that anchor urban centers. New investments by higher-education institutions in this building type continue this trend. This hard-hat tour will visit the nearly completed (December 2014) Lesley University College of Art and Design Studio Art building in Cambridge, providing insight into contemporary architectural practice for this building type. The relationship between the building design and the ways in which art is created and displayed will be explored. The team will highlight particular constraints of the community design review process and the re-use and incorporation of a historic building. Public program elements central to the arts -- Gallery, Library, and Interior/Exterior Assembly spaces -- will be discussed, focusing on their capacity to affect urban form and scale. We will identify common threads that link public architecture and site irrespective of particular program opportunities. Attendees are required to sign a waiver for this hard-hat tour.
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10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
Session Description Track CEU
C21 The Body in Space: Wayfinding ArchitectureBoston LU
In 1960, urban planner Kevin Lynch defined wayfinding as "a consistent use and organization of definite sensory cues from the external environment." In the modern era, that external environment is most likely a constructed one. How does wayfinding frame and enable our experience of moving through space, and how is it evolving in the face of contemporary tools and challenges?
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C22 Homes to Community Footprints: Tracking Energy Use and Targeting 2030 Residential Focus LU HSW
Are you interested in helping green your community? Building professionals trained in green design are uniquely qualified to provide needed leadership and vision to assist their communities in tracking the energy use of individual homes and buildings. In this session, two architects, a builder and a sustainable design specialist will share their efforts and strategies. The presenters will share results from three distinct projects: the ICLEI greenhouse gas protocol, step #1 of a Climate Action Plan for a Massachusetts town of 20,000; a new service offering an open source, online database of energy ratings linked to Google maps and HERS ratings for homes; and a review of national energy use data published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) linked to ongoing studies for benchmarking homes. We will discuss the relative GHG contributions of efficiency and renewables, new construction vs. renovations, and how buildings compare to other sectors of community energy use. The session will close with cost-effective building and design techniques and tools as we look towards 80% energy reduction for 2030, while engaging community buy-in and new technology.
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C23 MA Code Requirements for Existing Buildings Codes and Regulations LU HSW
Massachusetts adopts and amends the 2009 International Existing Building Code, offering several compliance options and unique requirements for fire protection and structural, specifically seismic, improvements. This presentation will provide an overview of these requirements with examples.
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C24 ***CANCELLED***EcoDistricts For Practitioners Urban Scale LU
The urban marketplace is rapidly growing with opportunity to change the way we revitalize our cities. In this engaging 90-minute exploration, you'll get a guided tour of the EcoDistricts Framework, our research-driven tool for cultivating public-private-civic partnerships and creating innovative district-scale projects, and learn firsthand how to fit all of the pieces together and accelerate sustainable development in your community, from the neighborhood up.
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C25 ***CANCELLED***Separation Anxiety (or How I Learned to Love Compartmentalization) Building Performance LU HSW
Now that the design and building industry has responded to the demands of building a rigorous enclosure, there is a new danger on the horizon: units leaking into other units. Driven by incentives, LEED, and the threat of liability, projects are looking for greater degrees of separation between spaces in buildings. Where does the air come from and where does it go? This presentation explores why buildings leak into themselves five times as much as they leak to the outside. It shows the range and the severity of inter-unit leakage. A lesson from the residential building industry with impact on many more sectors including office, education and health structures, compartmentalization addresses energy use, occupant comfort, contamination, sharing tobacco smoke and much more.
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C27 Innovative Practices in Land Development and Climate Resilience: Lessons From Hamburg Climate Resilience LU HSW
In 2013, a delegation from New England Women in Real Estate (NEWIRE) visited Hamburg, Germany to explore the HafenCity project and the International Building Expo (IBA) development model that created it. In this session, panelists from that delegation will discuss lessons learned and the feasibility of implementing similar projects in the Northeast. Topics will include Germany's financial/governmental framework and the upfront integrated process which merges the three pillars of sustainability: environmental, economic and social goals. Some of Hamburg's exciting renewable energy developments and inspiring clean energy solutions will be highlighted, as well as the infrastructure, public and private partnerships, development solicitation process and planning for these projects. Attendees will have the opportunity to discuss how the Hamburg models might be adapted to the Northeast, including the possibility of creating an International Building Expo here in Massachusetts.
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C28 Navigating the Fast-Changing World of LED Lighting Sound and Light LU HSW
The LED revolution is approaching like a tidal wave. What do architects need to know to stay on top of the surge of information? A panel of experts representing different sectors of the lighting industry will cover a range of topics, from basic terminology to the latest research in LED lighting. This workshop is designed to provide a broad understanding of LED lights and the important issues architects must understand to take full advantage of the technology. How does LED compare to other systems in cost, life, and life-cycle cost? Is LED the light source for all applications? Topics to be covered include lamp life, energy performance, color, maintenance, cost as well as forecasted developments in the industry.
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C29 What the #@&% Happened? Building Enclosures LU HSW
The presentation will look into three buildings that experienced major building enclosure assembly failures. The causes of these failures will be identified and discussed. No names will be named or acknowledged during or after the presentation. The purpose of the presentation is to help others in the industry avoid the failures experienced on these projects.
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C30 A Fox, a Hen, and Some Corn Need to Cross Boston Harbor... Case Studies and Project Types LU
Everyone is talking about creating more art on public and private sites and buildings. But what does it take to really get it done? It requires designers, artists, planners, public agencies, and property owners to get in the same boat together, and to have everyone still on board -- and alive! -- when they arrive at opening day. Hear from those who are creating temporary, and permanent public art what it takes to anchor art: literally, figuratively and financially. We will show examples from financial pro formas to built projects, and discuss site requirements, the permitting process and relationship-building.
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C31 Little Tinkers: Integrating Maker Space into K-12 Education Design Thinking and New Directions LU
How do we introduce children to design thinking? Unlock the tinker inside you and join our panel as we look at how educational programming is taking project-based learning to the next level. See how educators are unlocking creativity and developing confidence in their youth around science, technology, engineering, math and the arts through introducing the children to tools such as 3-D printers, robotics, and animation. How as architects can we create environments that help foster this design thinking? Explore models for maker spaces and the development of a maker space at Cambridge Friends School, and hear a student's educational experience from maintenance closet to incubator.
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C32 Expand Revenue by Linking BIM to Facilities Management Business Management and Development LU
Building owners continue to look for ways to lower the cost of facility operations given that upwards of 70% of the building cost is incurred during occupancy. How can architecture, engineering and construction firms help owners track and manage the lifecycle costs of a building? BIM solutions for facilities management represent a significant opportunity for new revenue. AEC firms should understand what owners would like to see from models and how that information will be used throughout the building's lifecycle. This session is a must for AEC professionals who are looking for achievable ways to grow their business and strengthen existing client relationships. This presentation will provide a deep understanding of what owners need in terms of facilities management and BIM. We will further discuss what services AEC firms can offer in this area, from providing the right modeling and database information to suggesting the right technologies or even managing facilities data directly. This session will include examples of how information is exchanged between familiar 2D/3D design and BIM management tools and a facilities management system.
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C33 Risks and Rewards of High Performance Strategies in Historic Buildings Existing and Historic Buildings LU HSW
New technologies and materials present opportunities to adapt existing historic buildings to meet challenges of climate change, rising fuel costs, and changing comfort standards. However, experience has shown that new strategies often do more harm than good when the existing building dynamics are not considered. Historic buildings originally were mechanically ventilated or air conditioned and are traditionally made of uninsulated materials, for years relying on their construction type, material properties and thickness to guard interior spaces from the outdoor environment. Experts in the field do not agree on the proper approach, and every historic building has its own history and dynamic. This seminar will discuss the risks and opportunities of upgrades, present examples of various adaptations, and offer protocols for understanding existing building performance and the impact of changes with a focus on responses to the impacts of climate change and energy use. We'll look at changing standards in thermal comfort; the impact of air barriers, insulation and mechanical systems on historic materials; pros and cons of new building materials in historic renovations; and also consider future trends and challenges.
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C34 ***CANCELLED***Breaking the Modular Roadblock: Modular Design/Build at Olmsted Green Multifamily Housing LU HSW
Creating affordable workforce housing in Boston has long been an issue. The use of modular construction systems to create such housing has been hampered by a lack of regional producers and concerns about impacts on the local labor market. This roadblock is about to be broken. California's ZETA DesignBuild, a leader in the development of sustainable and net-zero modular housing, plans to bring its technology and design approach to Olmsted Green, the ongoing redevelopment of the former Boston State Hospital site in Mattapan. The largest development site in Boston at 42 acres, Olmsted Green is already home to 150 units of affordable rental housing, and a small number of homeownership units. Nearly 300 homeownership units were planned before the real estate downturn halted construction; the reviving market presents a new opportunity to realize the project goals. In partnership with Olmsted Green's developers, New Boston Fund, and architects and planners ICON architecture, inc., ZETA is adapting its net-zero and near-zero modular units to build out the approved plans, and is in the process of identifying a suitable location to establish a Boston-area union ZETA manufacturing facility to implement this effort. Hear representatives from the developer, modular builder, and architect to learn how this is being carried out.
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SC1 COLORMIX 2015 LU
This course will take the participant on a visual journey with stimulating imagery, factual statistics and perceptive research that supports the 2015 forecast for color and design trends. We will explore the drivers influencing future color and design trends that include global, technological, historic, psychological and economic factors with specific information on the four dominant color stories for Chrysalis, Beyond, Buoyant and Unrestrained.
Speakers
  • Jackie Jordan, Director of Color Marketing, The Sherwin-Williams Co.
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11:30 AM - 1:00 PM
Session Description Track CEU
BSAC5 Reconnecting an Architectural Heritage: Dorchester's Urban Plan
1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Session Description Track CEU
C41 Construction Administration for Beginners For Emerging Professionals
Architects must make an important shift when their work moves into construction administration (CA). During preconstruction we advocate for our clients and the design, while during CA we need to be impartial judges, administering the contract and making judgments that may not favor the owner. This seminar will explore in depth the basic tools employed during the CA process. We'll talk about jobsite safety, interpretation of construction drawings, change orders, RFIs, punch lists and the inevitable adjustments and changes as projects reach fruition. The panel includes practicing architects whose experience ranges from fax machines to BIM models, collectively responsible for over $1B of construction in place. They will be joined by a builder and an engineer. How will you survive your first CA job? What should you anticipate? Can you wear a bowtie to the trailer? Can you walk on the steel and climb up in the crane with the operator? Should you hide screw-ups or pretend? We'll also discuss the master builder archetype, and various delivery methods. The presenters will approach the topic with humor and at least three real-world examples in a hands-on format so you can get your hands dirty within the safe confines of ABX.
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C42 The Science of Energy Codes, Part 1: 2012 IECC, the Enclosure and Keeping it Fresh in a Cold and Hot World Codes and Regulations LU HSW
The goal of this two part workshop is to provide participants with robust design and construction practices and knowledge of the building science that underpins the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code. The first section will focus on the enclosure in remodel/renovation and new construction projects. This workshop will not simply be a recitation of the mandatory requirements. We will focus on issues in the code that are open to interpretation or that are difficult to understand and use building science to clarify what is important and why.
Speakers
  • Caitriona Cooke, Director, Retrofit & New Con Consulting Services, Conservation Services Group
  • Michael Schofield, Senior Project Manager, Conservation Services Group
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C43 Peacebuilding Through Design Thinking: Architecture and Design as Tools for Problem Solving Design Thinking and New Directions LU
This workshop will give participants an opportunity to explore the diverse approaches of aesthetics and design work in contributing to inclusion in sacred spaces. We will examine historical precedents from the Abrahamic faiths that have created various pluralistic sacred spaces and communities. We will then address the issue of gender and space, examining successful case studies and demonstrating various design solutions through the means of art and architecture. Participants, in groups, will be "architect-for-a-day" and through the hands-on approach of design, will explore the commonalities of the art and architectural vocabulary of Empathy, Organization, Creativity, Design and Solution. This workshop and exercise has been used at the Army War College, Harvard Kennedy School FDR Global Citizenship Conference, Yale Design Week, Princeton, Claremont, Rice and MIT. The main objective of this workshop is for participants to understand and explore the commonalities of all the faiths and through the avenue of design, create pluralistic solutions for our present needs.
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C44 The Good, the Bad and the Ugly: Building Science through Pictures Building Performance LU HSW
The best way to fully understand the principles of building science is to see them in action. What happens when the laws of nature play out in our buildings? Experience the good, the bad, and the ugly in this session comprised almost exclusively of photos. We will cover a range of topics, but focus primarily on heat, air pressure and moisture, all of which move from high to low concentrations. Although this session will discuss theoretical concepts, it is driven by real-world issues. It will be lead by experienced field staff and is designed to be highly interactive. Participants are invited to bring their own interesting pictures to share.
Speakers
  • Caitriona Cooke, Director, Consulting Services, Conservation Services Group
  • Matt Root, Senior Project Manager, Conservation Services Group
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C45 Lean Construction 101 Construction LU HSW
Lean production management caused a revolution in the manufacturing world. Lean theory challenged the traditional notions about how to plan and manage work and achieved new levels of performance in return. A similar revolution is happening in construction. Already in Boston and around New England projects are using Lean Construction. Owners, designers and contractors are adopting Lean practices, and owners are requesting experience in Lean Project Delivery from their vendors. Applied in practice, Lean Construction makes it possible to improve quality, safety AND shorten project duration while reducing cost. In Lean Project Delivery, the facility and its delivery process are designed together to better reveal and support customer purposes. Work is structured throughout the process to maximize value and minimize waste. This discussion overviews the philosophy, principles and techniques of Lean Project Delivery and distinguishes Lean Construction from current project delivery practices. Integrated Project Delivery principles, value definition, Target Value Design, Last Planner in design and construction, Lean supply chain, pull methods, project production system design, continuous improvement in practice, and Lean culture will all be discussed.
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C46 Connecting LEED to Our Commonwealth: LEED Regionalization Climate Resilience LU HSW
LEED Regional Priority credits allow Massachusetts prioritize the environmental issues most critical to our region. What are the biggest priorities for the region? How different are the environmental issues for the Cape and Worcester? These are the sorts of questions that the USGBC MA Chapter team wrestled with to determine the Regional Priority Credits for the LEED V4 rating systems. The process entailed looking deeply at GIS and other available data for the special environmental and economic qualities of the cities and towns of Massachusetts to help define key issues. This presentation takes attendees through the process, starting with environmental mapping, leading to the definition of regional priorities, and ending in a list of credits and areas to emphasize. We'll also give special attention to defining the essential environmental qualities of each region of Massachusetts.
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C47 Made in Mass Sound and Light LU HSW
Massachusetts leads the country in energy efficiency and utility programs geared toward incentivizing the selection and application of efficient lighting. Too often the decision to pursue a utility incentive is made late in the project cycle, causing a lot of re-design that could be avoided if the conversation had occurred early in the planning process. The panel will discuss the various programs that are available (prescriptive vs. performance), and clarify the prerequisites such as minimum fixture efficiency, Energy Star Qualification, and DLC.
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C48 Building Enclosures: Science and Design for Energy Efficiency Building Enclosures LU HSW
We will look first at the building science of envelope durability. The science portion will focus on the building enclosure's contribution to both energy efficiency and durability, and the potential impact on long term durability of new energy codes addressing the building enclosure. Durability of the building enclosure is especially critical because its expected service life is longer than that of other building systems (e.g. mechanical, lighting, and water-heating). Next, we'll discuss how to achieve the new LEED v4 Envelope Commissioning (BECx) Credits, focusing on the value and process of BECx and the requirements to fulfill the new credits, as they apply to the building's thermal envelope. BECx ensures that passive load-defining envelope systems are identified, understood, and verified using procedures to verify that the project is achieving the OPR throughout the delivery of the project. The seminar will also review BECx examples from a range of projects: Chesapeake Bay Foundation Building in Annapolis, MD (climate zone 4); US Courthouse in Buffalo, NY (climate zone 5); Wisconsin Institute of Discovery in Madison, WI (climate zone 6); and the Washington Headquarters Building (does this mean USGBC headquarters??-AF) in Washington DC (climate zone 4).
Speakers
  • Wei Lam, Associate Principal, Wiss, Janney, Eltsner Associates, Inc.
  • Benjamin Meyer, Building Science Architect, DuPont Building Innovations
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C49 A Zero Net Energy Teaching Laboratory Case Studies and Project Types LU HSW
The 2030 challenge sets the trajectory for a carbon-neutral future in the building industry. This goal may seem out of reach for laboratory buildings with high plug-loads and strict HVAC requirements. But we are turning these hurdles into opportunities. Construction will start in 2014 for Bristol Community College's 50,000sf Zero Net Energy (ZNE) chemistry, biology, and medical/dental education building, one of the few ZNE buildings of its kind in the world. In this session, we will describe our game-changing approach to make this possible. This session includes information on precedent ZNE projects to put our project in context and is designed to show the attendees the details of how zero net energy can he achieved. This session is for owner and design team members committed to the pursuit of a carbon-neutral future who want to make the case and then execute designs for transformative energy performance.
Speakers
  • Jacob Knowles, Director of Sustainable Design, BR+A Consulting Engineers
  • Jim Moses, Director, Sasaki Associates, Inc
  • Tony Petone, Associate Principal, Bard, Rao + Athanas Consulting Engineering, LLC
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C50 Designing Urban Technologies The Future of Practice LU
The ubiquity of mobile devices, sensors, fiber-optic and wireless connectivity is allowing for new opportunities in the sphere of urban design. These emerging technologies have built the nervous system of the metropolis, facilitating new infrastructures that micro-intervene, and scale to the city - allowing us to sense, analyze and respond to invisible urban patterns and phenomena. To some, this moniker of the "smart city" represents a top-down infrastructural change akin to a digital version of Haussmann's Paris, giving rise to increased urban intelligence and sentient environments. It has become a tool for new spatial understanding, but how could it be leveraged towards architectural intervention? Within this technological evolution lies a progressive shift in architectural practice. Emerging voices are combining a fluency in technology with the language of design, formulating new infrastructures for the urban environment. These practitioners design criticality to bridge the gap between the intangible smart city and our tangible reality. This session gives voice to emerging practitioners who are harnessing the digitally-sensitized city, realizing these projects through physical prototypes, interventions, installations and built structures, and entering into dialogue for visions of new urban futures.
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C51 Cloudy with a Chance of Awesome Business Management and Development LU
It's clear that BIM has now significantly changed how buildings are designed and built. Over the years we've shifted from 'Lonely BIM' to 'Collaborative BIM' with building systems design modeling software becoming more robust. With industry goals of integrating facilities management to complete the entire project lifecycle and the emergence of fully integrated 6D models, there couldn't be a better time for the onset of cloud computing. The computing power needed to process and connect data between building information models, 3D laser scans, and building management systems, and to enable this data to be accessible from anyplace at any time is becoming a reality. With this technology, we now have the ability to author models on multiple platforms, link them within a shared virtual space and digitally access information on building components via many cloud-based options. Whether in the office or using tablet devices in the field, we can monitor systems, identify product manuals, or understand linkages from one mechanical element to the next. This session will introduce cloud computing, highlighting the concepts of infinite computing, connectivity, and software as a service. We will describe some uses on our projects using BIM360 Glue and Newforma project information management.
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C52 Evaluation, Rehabilitation, and Design of Slate and Clay Tile Roofing Existing and Historic Buildings LU HSW
Traditional slate or clay tile roofing systems have been used for thousands of years, and are character-defining features of many historic buildings and districts both in the US and abroad. When properly designed and installed, these roofing systems can remain durable and watertight for more than a century. Nevertheless, these roofing systems eventually require evaluation and rehabilitation or even replacement. This presentation provides critical information for the assessment, rehabilitation and design of clay tile and slate roofing systems, including material properties, terminology, tools, installation techniques, design of underlayment and flashing systems for water-tightness, laboratory testing to evaluate the anticipated durability of clay tile and natural slate shingles, specification of new slate or clay tile, use of insulation, air barriers and vapor retarders beneath these roofing systems, and other critical design and evaluation considerations.
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C53 The Vintage House: Ideas for Sensitive Additions and Successful Upgrades Residential Focus LU HSW
Houses inevitably face the need for changes, most often by adapting to the needs of new lifestyles and services or including additional space. This presentation explores ideas for creating historically sympathetic -- and practical -- additions by looking to traditional addition patterns as a guide, as well as solving some of the common renovation conundrums creating by adding modern mechanical systems.
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3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Session Description Track CEU
A63 Sharing Space in a Regulated Place Urban Scale LU
This panel will address how publicly-owned space can be better utilized, either directly, as with the Public Space Invitational sponsored by the City of Boston, or indirectly, through tactical urbanism. Shifting urban demographics in Boston and other cities provoke the question of how space, both public and private, might address the needs of cities going forward. Kris Carter of the Mayor's Office of New Urban Mechanics Streetscape Lab, will discuss projects submitted by designers, makers, artists, and engineers for Boston's 2014 Public Space Invitational. Mike Lydon of The Street Plans Collaborative will provide an overview of tactical urbanism. Corey Zehngebot will discuss how the design and planning study for Mount Vernon Street is being used as a civic engagement and early-stage implementation tool, along with other topic areas.
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C61 Real Estate Development 101 For Emerging Professionals
This is a 90-minute crash course in real estate development. Understand what really goes on pre- and post architectural involvement.
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  • Jess Garnitz, Designer, ADD Inc
  • Peter Gori, Assistant Vice President Retail Services, Colliers International
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C62 The Science of Energy Codes, Part 2: 2012 IECC, the Enclosure and Keeping it Fresh in a Cold and Hot World Codes and Regulations LU HSW
After the first session's focus on the enclosure and minimizing loads, the second portion of this workshop will concentrate on HVAC and indoor air quality in the context of the 2012 IECC. We will start with an assessment of what is traditionally done in cold climate regions and which current practices do not comply with the code. However, the bulk of this workshop will be centered on the opportunities for improvement and to inform architects of what they need to know about HVAC and the energy code. The content is grounded in the reality of what is occurring in the field and will be filled with project photographs that provide context.
Speakers
  • Caitriona Cooke, Director, Retrofit & New Con Consulting Services, Conservation Services Group
  • Michael Schofield, Senior Project Manager, Conservation Services Group
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C63 New Urban Agriculture Zoning in Boston: What's Cropping Up? Urban Scale LU HSW
In December 2013, the City of Boston and the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) ushered into law Article 89, comprehensive new zoning to enable a diverse range of agricultural enterprises that had long been banished from the city. Motivated by concerns for public health, environmental justice, neighborhood-building and placemaking, the City's goal in amending the Zoning Code was straightforward: remove barriers and pave the way for 21st-century food production. What agricultural landscapes does Article 89 envision, and what enterprises are taking shape in the wake of the new zoning? Hear from the BRA about the making and substance of the new zoning. Representatives of Boston's Department of Neighborhood Development and the Trust for Public Land describe their partnership in using public land to lead innovation in sustainable, land-based urban farming and community building and representatives of Arrowstreet Architects and Montreal-based Lufa Farms explain how high-tech rooftop greenhouse farms would work in cities like Boston.
Speakers
  • William Epperson, Senior Project Mananger, City of Boston Department of Neighborhood Development
  • Christopher LaPointe, Senior Project Manager, The Trust for Public Land
  • James Rathmell, Chief of Staff - Corporate Development Mgr & Marketing Coordinator, Lufa Farms
  • John Read, Senior Planner III, Boston Redevelopment Authority
  • Larry Spang, Architect and Principal, Arrowstreet Inc.
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C64 Integrated Daylight and Thermal Analysis for Optimized Building Envelopes Building Performance LU HSW
A building's energy use and user comfort are directly linked to two critical parameters of its envelope design: enhanced thermal performance and daylight harvesting capability. A good foundation for optimum envelope design requires integrated daylight and thermal analysis, so that the many diverse building design components efficiently function together. Early in the design process, components such envelope, site-orientation and shading systems are often analyzed independently from a daylighting perspective without accounting for their thermal performance. This may lead to occupant discomfort (glare), lack of daylight (closed blinds), wasted construction costs, and poor energy performance. What is lacking is a process that integrates daylighting and electric lighting simulation data with whole-building energy analysis to achieve a truly integrated high-performance design. In this session we will use case study examples to examine how daylighting performance can be integrated with thermal performance to achieve an optimized and balanced building design. Several simulation tools (DesignBuilder, Ecotect/Radiance, DIVA-for-Rhino) and sample projects will be presented to demonstrate a holistic design process that can be used to achieve this goal.
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C65 Lean Construction 201 Construction LU
Application of Lean Construction for all phases of project delivery is increasing as owners, designers, construction managers, and trade contractors embrace these new practices. Demand for companies and practitioners with knowledge and experience in Lean Project Delivery will continue to grow. In response to this demand, new chapters of the Lean Construction Institute have been sprouting all over the country and AGC of America has developed a Lean Construction Education Program. In this session, members of the Lean Construction Institute NE will conduct a simulation and debrief with participants that illustrate the concept and benefits of production systems design and pull. The simulation will be followed by a discussion of how pull is used in the Last Planner System to support planning and management of design and construction. The session will provide a hands-on illustration of basic Lean Construction concepts to expand participants understanding of its benefits and how it is applied.
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C66 NFPA 285: Assembly Test of Exterior Walls with Combustible Components Building Enclosures LU HSW
NFPA 285 is the Standard Fire Test Method for Evaluation of Fire Propagation Characteristics of Exterior Non-Load-Bearing Wall Assemblies Containing Combustible Components. NFPA 285 assembly tests are required when exterior non-combustible walls contain combustible components. The scope of materials classified by the International Building Code (IBC) requiring NFPA 285 testing is increasing. Combined with more stringent energy code requirements, the use of combustible materials is also growing in exterior walls. The most common contributing factors to non-compliance of designs requiring NFPA 285 assembly testing include: lack of understanding of applicability of test on exterior wall assemblies; recent building and energy code changes causing new triggers for the test; lack of understanding of assembly vs. product results for NFPA 285 tests. This seminar will discuss the impact of the NFPA 285 test on buildings using IBC and ASHRAE 90.1 energy code requirements, the parameters and history of NFPA 285, and the definition of what building envelope components are combustible and require NFPA 285 testing by IBC. All of these elements combine to integrate NFPA 285 compliant assemblies into building envelope systems.
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C67 ***CANCELLED***Phoenix from the Ashes: How Collaboration Overcomes Case Studies and Project Types LU
The Blackstone Gateway Visitor Center truly showcases how successful multi-player partnerships can be created. It is the result of collaboration among many stakeholders including Congressman Jim McGovern, MA Department of Conservation and Recreation, MA Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, City of Worcester, College of the Holy Cross, and Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor. The workshop will cover the project's long journey, including the destruction of plans by fire, and will showcase the relationship structure enabling each player to overcome and contribute to the successful advancement of the vision. As a case study, discussion will cover specific roles, challenges, and process for developing design across varied interests. The Visitor Center will be a multi-use facility featuring a welcome area, cultural exhibits highlighting the industrial heritage of Worcester, a theater, restroom facilities, and office and meeting space for DCR. An adjacent park will support passive recreation at the nexus of the Blackstone River, pedestrian paths, and the new Quinsigamond Village Bikeway. It is estimated the project will bring nearly $14M in initial investment. Representatives from the City of Worcester, Blackstone Heritage Corridor, and other stakeholders will participate in the presentation and discussion.
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C68 Making the Development of Historic Properties a Winning Proposition Existing and Historic Buildings LU HSW
Determining whether historic structures can be repurposed into environmentally and economically viable structures that aesthetically complement developer/architect/community goals can be a challenge. The importance of preserving the past while embracing the future influences the design process, from massing, structure and construction type to design typologies, systems integration and code compliance. It is also a key consideration when attempting to turn a perceived impediment into an opportunity. So how do you make the numbers work? What goes into the final determination to convert, renovate or reuse the site? Join us in a developer-led, architect-moderated discussion on the myriad considerations that factor into historic preservation projects and how design and economics influence the outcome.
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C69 Lead Your Firm Using Scenario Planning Business Management and Development LU
This program will present the objectives and importance of strategic planning, and the concept and process of considering alternative futures. It will demonstrate to the leaders of innovation-minded firms how to proactively choose a direction that is appropriate for themselves and their firms, yet remain flexible to change. Participants will gain a clear sense of the whats and whys of strategic planning and its component parts, the importance and sources of front-end research, the process of developing and evaluating alternative scenarios, and the method of choosing the one that is best for them. Participants will be able to apply the techniques in a case study exercise and, through small group work with others, report and discuss current and future applications in their own firms.
Speakers
  • Clive Landa, Principal, Landa Associates
  • Peter Piven, Principal Consultant, Peter Piven Management Consultants
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